What we got wrong about January 26

Amnesty International

Dear Kerri

January 26 is more than just a difficult time for First Nations communities in this country. For many First Nations People this date signifies the violence, trauma, harm and ongoing impacts of colonisation that their communities have experienced and continue to experience since invasion. 

As many Australians grow and learn the true history of this country, it’s important for me to acknowledge and emphasise that this does not exclude myself and the team here at Amnesty.

In the past, Amnesty led a campaign to Change the Date of ‘Australia Day’ to a more appropriate date in the year, that isn’t attached to the violence of colonialism. Through this campaign we developed resources for activists, shared information and explainers, and organised a petition that accumulated nearly 30,000 signatures from people across the country who were keen to see the date changed too. The last time we were active on this campaign was 2018. 

As an organisation committed to human rights and First Nations justice, Amnesty International Australia is no longer campaigning to change the date. In the time that has passed since we first campaigned on this issue, a lot has changed.

We have seen the conversation shift. We have heard the voices of First Nations communities demanding justice and accountability – and we’re listening.

January 26 is not a date to celebrate. However, it is our firm belief that there is not an appropriate date at any time in the year to celebrate colonisation, violence, trauma and the ongoing impacts of that harm on First Nations people. 

First Nations voices must be at the centre of the decisions, conversations, and campaigns that affect their communities. Amnesty is committed to upholding this with meaningful allyship – and equally as committed to listening and doing better when this allyship falls short.

Tomorrow, I encourage you to ensure First Nations people remain at the centre of your allyship. Attend local events in your area that acknowledge the survival of First Nations People, and the significance of the mourning communities are still experiencing due to injustices.

If you’re not able to physically attend events, I encourage you to read this extremely important blog penned by Amnesty’s Indigenous Rights lead, Gunggari person Maggie Munn.  

They’ve included digital actions you can take as well as some incredible watch, read and listen recommendations to further your learning of the true history of this country, its ongoing impacts, and what we can all do to meaningfully fight for First Nations justice.

In solidarity,

Samantha Klintworth, National Director, Amnesty International Australia

Amnesty International Australia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the land on which we meet and work throughout Australia. We pay respect to Elders past and present.

We understand many people across Australia have been negatively impacted by recent cyber incidents from a number of organisations. We want to reassure you that no similar incidents have impacted any supporter data held by Amnesty International Australia. In line with our Privacy Policy safeguarding your data remains a top priority. If you have any questions or concerns please contact our Supporter Care team on 1300 300 900.

We are 100% independent. This is how we can challenge the systems that enable injustice and abuses. Make a regular donation today and help power the movement for human rights.

Donate

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14 https://www.lifeline.org.au/

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families)

Advertisement

Tough Times From The Heart

Suicide Prevention Awareness Network Central Victoria

Tough Times From The Heart is in partnership with Tobin Brothers.

Tough Times From The Heart, promoting greater awareness of suicide prevention, focuses on the lived experience of four individuals who share their incredible stories and insights with journalist and broadcaster Justin Smith.

Designed to reduce stigma around suicide and encourage people who are experiencing suicidality and those closest to them to reach out, Tough Times From The Heart is authentic, confronting, and much-needed insight into the stories behind the statistics.

The videos give viewers insights into the experiences of those dealing with their own suicidality, their loss of loved ones from suicide, and how these experiences are being used to help others see themselves through tough times.

Tough Times From The Heart is a library of video resources available for any person or organisation to use to educate others and themselves, saving lives.  Each speaker in the series has three videos available, short, medium and extended video files.

If your organisation would like to access these resources in an MP4 file format for your own website or presentation, please contact us here. 

The Speakers

Alannah McGregor

Since the tragic suicides of two of her children, Angela and Stuart, Alannah has worked tirelessly to raise awareness of suicide prevention and educate others on what we can do to help those who are struggling.

Alannah shares with us her experiences of losing loved ones to suicide, and how painful the silence of others can be.

Preview Alannah’s interview below, and access the extended interviews here.

Jed Zimmer

Showing a brave face in public, Jed struggled with crippling anxiety behind closed doors. He allowed his mental health struggles to consume him for years before reaching out, admitting he might not be here today if he hadn’t spoken up. 

Now Jed shares his story to encourage others to reach out and get help, especially those who are feeling suicidal.

Preview Jed’s interview below, and access the extended interviews here.

Warren Davies

As a farmer, Warren’s struggle was intensified by the impacts of drought and the isolation of life on the farm. His mental health was further impacted by feelings of loneliness and shame.

It wasn’t until he reached out he realised that he was far from alone in his struggle, and his resilience and determination has earned him the title, ‘The Unbreakable Farmer’.

Preview Warren’s interview below, and access the extended interviews here.

Dr Skye Kinder

Dr Skye Kinder is a regional mental health professional who has a passion for showing people there is help for them and changing the way we talk about suicide.

While Dr Kinder admits there are certainly challenges for those navigating support services, she also points out the importance of getting help sooner, to make that process easier and prevent issues developing further.

Preview Skye’s interview below, and access the extended interviews here.

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14 https://www.lifeline.org.au/

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families)

International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP) Australasian Research Workshop

8th – 9th February 2023

The 2023 Australasian Research Workshop which is cohosted by IASP and Orygen will be held on 8-9 February 2023 at Orygen in Melbourne.

The workshop features guest speaker Dr Mark Sinyor and a fantastic line-up of experts and leaders, and aims to develop collaborations and discuss the challenges faced in suicide prevention.

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14 https://www.lifeline.org.au/

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families)

Petition EN4498 – Redress for survivors of child sex abuse in gymnastics

Petition Status – The petition is currently open for signatures for FOUR more days

Petition Reason

History records that child sex offenders have circulated throughout gymnastics for decades, praying on little children. I am the victim of one such offender, secured a conviction and have applied for redress through our National Redress Scheme (“the Scheme”). Many others will follow after me, needing a formalised apology and financial justice. The peak body for our sport, Gymnastics Australia, qualifies financially to sign on, and stated almost two years ago it was “on-boarding” with the Scheme. I applied over a year ago, and still GA have not signed up. The Federal Government has the power to withdraw the millions of dollars in funding it delivers to Gymnastics Australia if it refuses to sign up. Our government set up these trigger provisions because it recognised that organisations do not always keep to their promises. We ask the government to exercise its trigger provisions if GA has not signed up by December 2022.

Petition Request

We therefore ask the House to use its trigger provisions to withdraw funding for Gymnastics Australia if it hasn’t signed up to the Scheme by December 2022.

Signature count:583
Closing date for signatures:23 November 2022 11:59 PM (AEDT)4 days left

https://www.aph.gov.au/e-petitions/petition/EN4498

Sexual assault and family violence support lines:

Gymnastics Australia yet to join National Redress Scheme despite promise to survivors of abuse

ABC Sunshine Coast / By Owen Jacques

Posted Thu 17 Nov 2022 at 3:34pm Thursday 17 Nov 2022 at 3:34pm, updated Thu 17 Nov 2022 at 3:56pm

Alison Quigley was groomed and sexually assaulted by her coach. It took decades before he was convicted of the crimes.(Supplied: Alison Quigley)

A Sunshine Coast woman says she has been left in limbo by Gymnastics Australia, which has not yet joined the National Redress Scheme for abuse survivors despite years of promises.

Key points:

  • Gymnastics Australia vowed to join the National Redress Scheme more than two years ago
  • The Department of Social Services says it take about six months for most institutions to get joined up
  • Gymnastics Australia says it has sent a letter of intent to the department and is working through the process

Alison Quigley, who was sexually abused as a teenage gymnast in the 1980s, has been waiting for more than two years for the sporting body to make good on its word.

The National Redress Scheme is designed to offer support to those who faced institutional child sexual abuse by offering counselling, a redress payment, and “a direct personal response” from the organisation responsible.

Ms Quigley was a national junior team champion at the age of 14 in Victoria when she was groomed and raped by 40-year-old Graham Partington in 1981.

Partington was convicted and jailed for his crimes in 2017, but it would be years before the sport would be forced to reckon with its past

A denial in the face of the facts

The jailing of famed US gymnastics coach Larry Nassar in 2017, along with allegations from hundreds of overseas athletes, increased the scrutiny on Australian gymnastics.

Nonetheless, Gymnastics Australia chief executive Kitty Chiller claimed in 2018 that there had “never been any evidence of abuse” of Australian gymnasts.

That was despite Ms Quigley’s abuser having already been convicted, as had Geoffrey Dobbs, who preyed on more than 100 girls over almost 30 years while a teacher and gymnastics coach.

The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse also published examples of child sexual abuse, including by a primary school gymnastics teacher.

Amid growing pressure after the release of the Athlete A documentary, Gymnastics Australia asked for the Australian Human Rights Commission to review the sport in 2020.

What the report found:

  • Gymnastics has not appropriately and adequately addressed complaints of abuse and harm, and [the sport] is not safeguarding children and young people
  • An ongoing focus in gymnastics on the “ideal body”, especially for young female athletes … can result in eating disorders
  • A focus on “winning at all costs” and an acceptance of negative and abusive coaching behaviours has resulted in … an increased risk of abuse and harm
  • There is an insufficient focus on understanding and preventing the full range of behaviours that can constitute child abuse and neglect in gymnastics
  • Coaching practices create a risk of abuse and harm to athletes

That led to the Change the Routine report in May last year, which found coaching practices created “a risk of abuse and harm” to athletes.

Ms Quigley said the findings and the response from Gymnastics Australia had given survivors hope.

“The survivor community recognised that it was time the needle shifted, and it looked as though things were going to start moving forward,” she said.

In late 2020, Gymnastics Australia said in its annual report that it was signing up to the National Redress Scheme.

On average, that process takes three to six months.

A promise made, but not yet kept

Ms Quigley said she had no reason to suspect Gymnastics Australia’s application would take any longer than others, so she waited about six months before applying to the scheme in mid-2021.

A black and white image of a teenage girl doing gymnastics.
Alison Quigley competed at an elite in the 1980s.(Supplied: Alison Quigley)

“At first I thought, ‘Oh, that’s funny, it’s not coming up in the search terms’ — [unlike] when you look at institutions that have signed up. It must be some administrative glitch,” she said.

But two years after first flagging its intention to sign up to the scheme and 18 months since Ms Quigley applied, there has been no word from Gymnastics Australia.

“If you think about what survivors have gone through, if you think about the abuse and how they’ve reported it to the associations … they’ve done nothing — there’s no trust,” she said.

“We’ve got all this kind of silence and guardedness and privateness.

“We’re not identifying individuals here, so I don’t really understand why the process has to be hush-hush.”

In the works, Gymnastics Australia says

Gymnastics Australia was contacted for comment about its progress multiple times by the ABC.

It declined to explain the cause of the delays or provide any message to the survivors waiting for it to join the redress scheme.

A spokeswoman confirmed Gymnastics Australia had sent a letter of intent and was “working with the scheme to complete the onboarding and assessment process”.

The Department of Social Services controls the scheme and would not discuss Gymnastics Australia for privacy restrictions.

A spokesman said the department kept in touch with institutions even if they were unable to meet the scheme’s financial or legal requirements in case that changed in the future.

“The scheme understands that waiting for institutions to join the scheme can be a difficult and traumatic experience,” he said.

Ms Quigley has launched a parliamentary petition in the hope of driving change within the sport that she continues to adore despite the pain it has inflicted on her.

“I’m wearing two hearts, I guess, because I do love the sport,” she said.

“We were in it for the joy of it — the joy of flying and the thrill of being so coordinated, and excited about just flying through the air unabated.

“What we really need to get a handle on is how we administer this sport.

“We have to do better than we are at the moment, keeping kids safe.”

Sexual assault and family violence support lines:

“Suicide prevention in primary care”

Centre for Mental Health Seminar Series Presenter: Dr. Faraz Mughal

University of Melbourne School of Population & Global Health

Thursday 13 October 2022 12.00 noon – 1.00 pm

via Zoom
https://unimelb.zoom.us/j/87401044758?
pwd=QnR3MEl6VXBHMm01QjZlRVltYU1BUT09
Password: 954581

Suicide prevention is an international priority. Healthcare settings remain an important avenue for the identification, assessment, and treatment of people who have harmed themselves and who are at risk of suicide.
In more developed countries, primary care has an integral role in a cross-sector multidisciplinary approach to suicide prevention.
I will set the context of why primary care is a key setting in the prevention of suicide, share past and current research findings with a focus on young people, and outline next steps that should be taken to optimise primary care settings for suicide prevention.

Dr. Faraz Mughal

Faraz is an academic GP with expertise in young people’s mental health and suicide prevention. His active research areas are self-harm and suicide prevention, ADHD, and mental health care transitions in community and primary care settings.
After becoming a GP, he was awarded three consecutive NIHR Fellowships, and is a current NIHR Doctoral Fellow.
He leads the NIHR funded ‘COPING’ study: a COproduced
Psychosocial INtervention delivered by GPs for young people who self harm.
He was a guideline committee member of the 2022 NICE self -harm guidance.
He is an expert advisor to Department of Health and Social Care and NHS England.
He co-chairs the IASP suicide prevention in primary care special interest group. He has over 60 peer-reviewed publications and is an elected
Fellow of the Royal College of General Practitioners.

These seminars are free. Visitors are welcome to attend.
For more information contact the Centre for Mental Health +61 3 8344 0908

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14 https://www.lifeline.org.au/

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families)

The national initial assessment & referral (IAR) for mental healthcare guidance & decision support tool

The ALIVE Mental Health Research Virtual Café Translation Conversations

27th October 2022, 2.00 – 3.00 pm (AEDT) Jenni Campbell

The Australian Department of Health and Aged Care is introducing the Initial Assessment and Referral Decision Support Tool – known and referred to as the IAR-DST (link). The IAR Guidance provides support to clinicians regarding how to respond to people when they first ask for mental health support in primary care settings. It guides clinicians in considering what information should be collected during a mental health assessment. The decision support tool often referred to as the IAR-DST, is an aid that is designed to provide clinicians with an estimate of the intensity of the mental health response that the person may need. This could confirm clinical judgement or bring further deliberation to the decision-making process. The aim of using the tool is to connect the person seeking support with the right care as early as possible in their journey.The IAR-DST helps to estimate or confirm the level of mental healthcare assistance that a person might require. In doing so, we are seeking the least intensive and least intrusive intervention that will likely lead to the most significant possible gain. Avoiding under-servicing and over-servicing.

  • Where a person experiences under-servicing, they are unlikely to get sufficient support to achieve a therapeutic benefit, prevent deterioration, and reduce the risk of harm (if present).
  • Over-servicing can lead to a treatment burden for the person seeking support. As the resource or service burdens accumulate, some people are overwhelmed, drop out of care, or have a poor care experience.

The IAR guidance and the IAR-DST will be used nationally by Commonwealth-funded mental health services and beyond and, by doing so, will begin to create a common language across the mental health sector to communicate about a person’s treatment needs. The presentation will provide an:

  1. Introduction to IAR and the development of the National Guidance.
  2. Orientation to the domains, levels of care, and decision support tool.
  3. Opportunity for discussion

About the speaker: Jenni currently provides consultancy services to the Australian Department of Health and Aged Care delivering the National Initial Assessment and Referral for Mental Healthcare initiative. Jenni recently concluded a 4-year ministerial appointment as Chair of the NSW Mental Health Commission Advisory Council and is a board member of Perinatal Anxiety and Depression Australia (PANDA). Jenni has qualifications in social work and health service management.

Click here to register!

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14 https://www.lifeline.org.au/

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families)

Prevention through connection: supporting veterans to thrive when their service ends

Black Dog Institute

Posted 26th July 2022

Serving Army Corporal Tom Cafe – Encouraging his mates to Check 5

“Years ago we would have said, ‘There’s not much we can do here.’ We were being defeated through this issue, suicide prevention … What has changed in the last few years is using a systems approach [that’s] veteran led [and includes] people with lived experience. There’s a difference we can make here … That, to me, is a pretty important message to get across.”

Operation Compass and the National Suicide Prevention Trial

In 2016, the National Suicide Prevention Trial (NSPT) was launched at 12 sites across Australia. Funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health and led by 10 Primary Health Networks, the trial sought to make
an important contribution to the evidence base underpinning suicide prevention activity in Australia.
The trial sites were tasked with delivering suicide prevention activities within their local regions. Each site served one or more priority populations considered to be at increased risk of suicide. Operation Compass, delivered via the Northern Queensland Primary Health Network (NQPHN), was the only NSPT site to deliver
targeted interventions for ex-serving veterans and their families (while the trial was initially focused on
ex-serving veterans, over time it expanded to support serving veterans as well). This focus was a reflection
of the trial site’s location in Townsville, Australia’s largest garrison city, where the veteran community
(both serving and ex-serving) makes up an estimated 20 per cent of the local population.

A recent report from the Black Dog Institute shares learnings and recommendations from Operation Compass and the veteran-focused suicide prevention program developed and run as part of the 2016-2021 National Suicide Prevention Trial in Townsville, Queensland.

The report, Prevention through connection: supporting veterans to thrive when their service ends, was informed by seven in-depth interviews exploring the experiences of the Operation Compass project team to capture their learnings with the aim of informing future suicide prevention efforts within the veteran community.

Operation Compass utilised the LifeSpan Systems model to co-design more than 20 suicide prevention projects across six campaigns for the Townsville veteran community. The program was guided by a veteran lived experience advisory group and steering committee with representation of veterans, Australian Defence Force personnel, mental health specialists, police and other emergency service workers, Open Arms and the Townsville Suicide Prevention Network.

Five key recommendations emerged from the interviews:

  1. Incentivise wellbeing: give ex-serving veterans access to services that emphasise wellness, and provide a reason to engage with and support others as part of their own recovery.
  2. Maintain momentum: create report commissioning processes that are realistic to support and maintain momentum and outputs.
  3. Invest in local lived experience and peer support: adjust processes to acknowledge the value of lived experience advice, of veteran-to-veteran trust and of peer-led support spaces.
  4. Empower Primary Health Networks: provide data on the number of veterans within local areas and build relationships between Primary Health Networks and veteran-focused organisations.
  5. Commit to longer-term funding: develop approaches for suicide prevention to support the quality, quantity and sustainability of outcomes.

Ex-serving veterans have significantly higher age-adjusted suicide rates than the general Australian population. Ex-serving males are 24% more likely to die by suicide and ex-serving females are 102% more likely (or about twice as likely) compared to other Australian males and females, according to a report by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The National Suicide Prevention Trial was launched in 2016 at 12 sites across Australia, funded by the Commonwealth Government and led by Primary Health Networks to develop local suicide prevention activities. Each site served one or more priority population considered to be at increased risk of suicide. Northern Queensland Primary Health Network was the only trial site to develop targeted interventions for ex-serving veterans and their families.

Head of Implementation for Black Dog Institute, Janey McGoldrick, welcomed the report and approaches developed, including the use of lived experience and peer support.

“We encourage all Primary Health Networks and Veteran Wellbeing Centres throughout Australia to learn from this work and consider what can be applied to their veterans’ communities,” Ms McGoldrick said.

View the Prevention through connection: supporting veterans to thrive when their service ends report

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14 https://www.lifeline.org.au/

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families)

World Suicide Prevention Day Saturday 10th September 2022

Creating hope through action – International Association for Suicide Prevention

For resources, events, and suggestions on how to get involved:

https://www.iasp.info/wspd/

By encouraging understanding, reaching in and sharing experiences, we want to give people the confidence to take action. To prevent suicide requires us to become a beacon of light to those in pain.

You can be the light.

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14 https://www.lifeline.org.au/

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families)

The ALIVE Mental Health Research Virtual Café Translation Conversations #6

Monday, 29th August at 4.30 – 5.30pm

Register now – Collaborative film and immersive media projects: understanding trauma from lived-experience perspectives

The ALIVE National Centre is proud to present the sixth instalment of Ready, Set, Translate: The ALIVE Mental Health Research Virtual Café Translation Conversations, on Monday 29th August at 4.30pm – 5.30pm AEST.

Jill will talk about her collaborative film and immersive media projects, which focus on understanding trauma from lived experience perspectives – as well The Big Anxiety festival, which visits Melbourne in September (21 Sep – 15 Oct). She will discuss her approach to trauma-informed co-creation, highlighting creative collaborations with Uti Kulintjaku – Ngangkari (traditional healers) from the Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunyjatjara Women’s Council (NPYWC), as well as Virtual Reality (VR) in suicide prevention, and new work exploring experiences of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) diagnosis.

The conversation will be hosted by the Stream A work in priority populations program, and will feature Jill Bennett speaking on the topic: Collaborative film and immersive media projects: understanding trauma from lived-experience perspectives.


Click here to register and see more information here!

Warm regards,

The ALIVE Team

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For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14 https://www.lifeline.org.au/

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families)