Nobody’s Normal:How Culture Created the Stigma of Mental Illness

by Roy Richard Grinker (Author, George Washington University)

A compassionate and captivating examination of evolving attitudes toward mental illness throughout history and the fight to end the stigma.

For centuries, scientists and society cast moral judgments on anyone deemed mentally ill, confining many to asylums. In Nobody’s Normal, anthropologist Roy Richard Grinker chronicles the progress and setbacks in the struggle against mental-illness stigma—from the eighteenth century, through America’s major wars, and into today’s high-tech economy.

Nobody’s Normal argues that stigma is a social process that can be explained through cultural history, a process that began the moment we defined mental illness, that we learn from within our communities, and that we ultimately have the power to change. Though the legacies of shame and secrecy are still with us today, Grinker writes that we are at the cusp of ending the marginalization of the mentally ill. In the twenty-first century, mental illnesses are fast becoming a more accepted and visible part of human diversity.

Grinker infuses the book with the personal history of his family’s four generations of involvement in psychiatry, including his grandfather’s analysis with Sigmund Freud, his own daughter’s experience with autism, and culminating in his research on neurodiversity. Drawing on cutting-edge science, historical archives, and cross-cultural research in Africa and Asia, Grinker takes readers on an international journey to discover the origins of, and variances in, our cultural response to neurodiversity.

Urgent, eye-opening, and ultimately hopeful, Nobody’s Normal explains how we are transforming mental illness and offers a path to end the shadow of stigma.

Roy Richard Grinker is professor of anthropology and international affairs at the George Washington University. He is the author of several books, including Unstrange Minds: Remapping the World of Autism. He lives in Washington, DC.

https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/latenightlive/stigma-mental-illness_richard-grinkler/13165558

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Postvention Australia Live Webinar “The value of peer support in Postvention”

Wednesday 24th February 2021 12.00 pm – 2.00 pm

This webinar episode acknowledges the value of lived experience and peers in post-suicide support. First-hand knowledge, understanding of bereavement & healing journey are vital in supporting those impacted by suicide, whilst also instilling a sense of purpose for the peer workers themselves. The session includes:

  • Jill Chapman, Co-Founder, MOSH (Minimisation of Suicide Harm), will present on the suicide bereavement support groups she ran, after losing her son, Michael, to suicide. 
  • Louise Flynn, Manager, Support After Suicide Jesuit Social Services, will run an informative session aimed at those bereaved by suicide who wish to start their own support groups. 
  • Panel discussion between speakers Louise, Jill and a peer support group attendee, on their experiences in facilitating and attending peer support groups. 
  • Q&A session.

Registration: Free
Event website: http://webinars.postventionaustralia.org
Aim: To help reduce stigma surrounding suicide and improve community awareness & understanding of the bereavement experience

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Griffith University Research – “We would like to know about your experiences using an antipsychotic medication”

Are you 18 years or older and have been using an antipsychotic to manage a mental illness for at least 3 months?

If so, then Griffith University researchers want to talk to you about your journey.
We are driven to understand your individual experience and perspective about using an antipsychotic, the impact of this medication on multiple facets of your daily life (e.g. emotional and physical) and the strategies you have used to overcome these effects.
With your participation, strategies used to overcome the negative impacts of antipsychotics can be further understood and used to assist new or current users of antipsychotics in overcoming associated side effects.
Study ethics approval has been obtained from Griffith University (2020/945).

What is involved?

  • A chat (30-45 minutes) with a researcher at your local Stepping Stone Clubhouse or via the phone, or online, at a time convenient to you.
  • We would also like to discuss your journey leading to the use of antipsychotics, other medication use (if applicable) and involvement with health professionals.
  • To further ensure that study findings are relevant and are an accurate representation of your viewpoint on the topic, there will be an opportunity for a follow up discussion OR focus group with other participants to discuss the research and gather feedback.
  • You are welcome to bring a support person if that is your wish.
  • You will receive a $30 gift voucher as appreciation for you time.
  • If you are interested
    Please email Ben Lumsden: ben.lumsden@griffithuni.edu.au

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Communities of Practice Skills Development Program for Consumers, Families and Carers

Lived Experience Australia is offering 24 places in our new Communities of Practice – Skills Development Program for Consumers, Families and Carers. Each program will have a maximum of 12 participants.This 6 month program commencing in late March 2021 aims to develop and build knowledge, skills, confidence and capacity to support you as a systemic advocate and undertake representational roles in national, state, local and organisation specific forums, committees and groups to provide input and advocate on behalf of those with a lived experience. Learning is undertaken in a supported communities of practice environment with consumer and carer peers.The program consists of a Zoom session held once a month for 2 hours with learning, reflection and activities undertaken between sessions. You have the opportunity to practice skills learned as you progress through the program with the final session being a real-life advocacy representation opportunity.The program is open to consumers, families and carers who currently undertake lived experience representational roles on committee, groups, or forums in the mental health sector or are expecting to in the near future.

The program is fully subsidised (no cost).

You must submit your application by Friday 29 January 2021

Successful applicants will be notified in February 2021 and must be ready to commit to the 6 month program between March – August 2021. 

Dates for the groups are as follows:

Group 1 Dates: Thursdays from 2-4pm (AEDT)
25 March 2021
29 April 2021
3 June 2021
24 June 2021
22 July 2021
19 August 2021

Group 2 Dates: Fridays 2-4pm (AEDT)
26 March 2021
30 April 2021
4 June 2021
25 June 2021
23 July 2021
20 August 2021

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

‘You just can’t understand what is happening to you’: new support for those left behind by suicide

By Kate Aubusson October 30, 2020 — 12.00am

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/you-just-can-t-understand-what-is-happening-to-you-new-support-for-those-left-behind-by-suicide-20201028-p569g5.html

The grief that follows suicide is a complex fusion of guilt, anger and utter shock that Sandy Smith knows intimately.

Her life became a strange entanglement of overwhelming emotion and administrative box-ticking the night her husband Kurt took his own life in April 2017. Her youngest of four sons was just seven months old.

“You just can’t understand what is happening to you at that point,” Ms Smith, 37, said.

“You never prepare for something like that and then you have to deal with all of these things in complete shock.”

Police wanted her go to hospital to identify her husband, she was handed forms for the morgue, soon she would need to start making funeral arrangements, notify Medicare and go to Centrelink.

She didn’t know if she was entitled to any bereavement payments or Kurt’s life insurance. The advice from well-meaning people around her varied from confusing to counterfactual.

“So many people said don’t tell the boys how Kurt died … don’t tell anyone it was a suicide,” Ms Smith said.

“There is still so much shame attached to it, which we need to change. I don’t want my kids to carry that shame with them.”

When a person takes their own life, the devastating reverberations are felt by on average five immediate family members and up to 135 other people in their community.

The loved ones of people who die by suicide are at greater risk of suicide themselves compared to the general population.

Families of people who die by suicide in NSW will soon have the support of people who deeply empathise with their shock and anguish, specialised counselling and practical assistance with the unavoidable administrative tasks that encroach on their grief.

The NSW government is investing $4.5 million in its Post Suicide Support service to address this long tail of trauma by helping families navigate the aftermath of suicide, as well as supporting first responders and community members who have witnessed or discovered a suicide.

StandBy: Support After Suicide has been granted $4.2 million to run a statewide ‘postvention’ service, offering peer support from people with their own experience of losing a loved one through suicide, family and individual counselling or therapy for partners and children, as well as practical assistance dealing with police, coroners and funeral arrangements and myriad other administrative burdens.

The first counsellor Ms Smith saw didn’t want her to bring her infant son to her appointments because, she said he would feel her emotions.

The second counsellor fitted her with a heart monitor. When her heart rate rose, she had to stop talking.

“Every time I talked about Kurt my heart rate would go up so I could never talk about him,” she said.

The practical support of the postvention program will be invaluable, Ms Smith said.

“But the most will healing thing for me was being with people who have lived experience [of suicide]. They just get it. They know how complicated this grief really is, they’ve walked ahead of you down this path and they know that it does get better,” she said.

“It does get better. I’ve fallen down a few times but I’m in a pretty good place right now,” she said.

The new service is part of the NSW government’s $87 million Towards Zero Suicides strategy.

NSW Mental Health Minister Bronnie Taylor said postvention was a critical part of the suicide prevention response.

“This is what people with lived experience were telling us they needed … there just weren’t any services to help people get through this really difficult time,” Ms Taylor said.

First responders, including police, paramedics and firefighters, as well as members of the public who witness a suicide may also be profoundly affected.

“The real key is having a specialised workforce for post suicide support that will provide the emotional and practical support,” Ms Taylor said, “from accessing existing government services to explaining a suicide death to young children,” she said.

The program is expected to be running before the end of the year.

The state government will also invest $376,000 in national suicide bereavement organisation Postvention Australia to deliver a NSW Directory that will filter services by location, type of professional, and community characteristics, as well as a Suicide Bereavement Care training course for professionals supporting grieving loved ones and a suicide Bereavement Care Pack.

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Suicide Prevention Australia Announcing: 2021 States in Focus Week

Date: Monday 8 February to Thursday 11 February 2021 (one event each day)
Time: 12:00 – 12:45pm AEDT (Sydney/Canberra/Melbourne time)
Cost: Member – Free | Non-Member – $25 | Student – $15


Suicide Prevention Australia is thrilled to announce that our recently launched Joint State/Territory Committees are hosting the first official States in Focus Week.This week will feature four online events, each one a different state and territory combination. We’ll be talking about current events, recent developments and hearing from inspiring local speakers who are doing great things for suicide prevention.

There will be an opportunity to chat with others in states/ territories across Australia, as well as ask questions to our interesting speakers.

Members of Suicide Prevention Australia receive complimentary registration and are welcome to attend the sessions from any state/ territory. Contact us for more information on how to become a member.
 

Event Information

Monday 8 February 2021 – NT & QLD in Focus
Featuring Jye Cardona
Moderated by Justin Geange, Field Officer, MATES in Construction

Tuesday 9 February 2021 – NSW & ACT in Focus
Speaking information coming soon
Moderated by James Bell, Group Manager, Suicide Prevention Services, Wesley LifeForce, Lifeline Sydney & Sutherland, Mental Health & Resilience Program

Wednesday 10 February 2021 – VIC & TAS in Focus
Featuring Jack Heath, CEO, Philanthropy Australia 
Moderated by Graeme Holdsworth

Thursday 11 February 2021 – SA & WA in Focus
Featuring Professor Nicholas Procter, chair: mental health nursing, unisa clinical and health sciences | mental health and suicide prevention research group 
Moderated by: Karen McColl, Adviser, Office of the Premier’s Advocate for Suicide Prevention


REGISTER NOW

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Suicide Prevention Australia On-line Symposium 19-22 April 2021

The Suicide Prevention Australia Symposium 2021 presents a unique opportunity to bring the brightest minds together and latest thinking to promote excellence in suicide prevention. This online event provides a gateway to unite suicide prevention experts to showcase evidence-based solutions and robust discussion, focused on solutions for saving lives.

Given the challenges and uncertainly posed by COVID19, our annual National Suicide Prevention Conference will be replaced by the symposium in 2021. The theme, ‘Gateway to Excellence’, is aligned with our commitment to enhance best practice. Striving for excellence in suicide prevention is imperative for delivering safe, high quality and consistent standards of care.

Held on 19-22 April 2021, this online symposium will attract around 500 delegates to hear from international keynote speakers, participate in workshops and collaborate with their peers.

The symposium will focus on the themes of:

• Stigma, mental ill-health and suicide;
• Psychological and social risk factors;
• Postvention and exposure to suicide; and
• Support and care to vulnerable population groups.

As the national peak body for suicide prevention, Suicide Prevention Australia promotes quality improvement to build sector capability and allocates millions of dollars for research. We are dedicated to identifying and responding to gaps in knowledge, policy and practice.

Incorporating people with lived experience is central to everything we do at Suicide Prevention Australia and their voice is an important part of the symposium. A lived experience of suicide can range from suicidal thoughts, surviving a suicide attempt, caring for someone through crisis, being bereaved by suicide or being touched by suicide in any way.

Tragically, around 800 000 people die due to suicide every year. We can never underestimate the impact that every life lost to suicide has on family, friends, workplaces and the broader community. The Suicide Prevention Australia Symposium 2021 presents a critical gateway to help support best practice suicide prevention solutions that will save lives.

Symposium Outcomes

• Increase sector commitment to participate in a collaborative approach to suicide prevention
• Enhance community participation in suicide prevention activities
• Expand the translation of research in suicide prevention
• Facilitate the continuation and development of quality, evidence-based suicide prevention initiatives

Key Dates

AnnouncementDate
Call for abstracts close22 January 2021
Early bird registration closes15 February 2021
Abstract authors notified of outcome15 February 2021
Bursary recipients notified15 February 2021
Last day for speakers to register4 March 2021

Suicide Prevention Australia remembers those we have lost to suicide and acknowledges the suffering suicide brings when it touches our lives. We are brought together by experience and unified by hope.

Imagine a world without suicide.

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Key reports call for a compassionate, whole of government approach for suicide prevention

Posted by Life in Mind (Australia) 16th December 2020 in Updates from the Prime Minister’s National Suicide Prevention Adviser

Today, the Prime Minister publicly released the Interim Advice documents prepared to shape Australia’s suicide prevention approach. This will enable further consultation to occur over the coming weeks to inform the Final Advice

The Interim Advice consists of three interrelated reports: (1) Compassion First, detailing the experiences of people with lived experience of suicide; (2) Interim Advice Report containing 13 in-principle recommendations; and (3) Shifting the Focus, outlining a whole-of-government approach to suicide.   

We know from our data that 3,318 Australians died by suicide last year; seven men and two women each day.  We also estimate that another 180 people each day will find their situation so unbearable that they attempt suicide and many more people will experience suicidal distress. Behind each of these numbers is a person, a journey, and a network of other people.

This year in my role as National Suicide Prevention Adviser, I have had the opportunity to talk to many people across our community who have lived experience, and indeed lived expertise, of suicide. It is their experiences and their collective knowledge that has shaped the Interim Advice more than any other source of enquiry this year.

The Compassion First report captures the voices of close to 2,000 people with lived experience of suicidal behaviour, particularly those who have survived attempts or lived with suicidal distress. 

What they have clearly said is that what we need is connected, compassionate and supportive responses to the underlying distress, adversity and trauma so many people experience, rather than a medicalised and crisis-driven approach.

Suicidal distress often stems from cumulative pain, disadvantage, disconnection and trauma that can build up over time. It can also occur in the context of a sudden change or a period of acute distress often linked to adverse life events or transitions. We need to act much earlier than we have been to stop people reaching the point of crisis.      

The Interim Advice calls for a national whole-of-government approach that strengthens and builds on what our health systems can offer. To be effective, we need all jurisdictions and portfolios working together.

It is clear that we need to go to where people are and respond much earlier than we have been. That means developing the workforce and embedding support in our family courts, in employment services, in schools and workplaces, in our family and social services.

It also means using the levers of government and partnerships with other agencies to reduce and respond to the social and economic drivers of distress that are often deeply rooted in the social determinants of health – job security, economic security, safety from violence and abuse, meaningful participation and social connection. 

In our national response, it is imperative that we consider all of the factors that may increase distress and ensure our approach works for men as well as for women, because we know the impacts for each can very different and the places they seek support can be very different. 

We need to ensure we have a focus on younger people who are experiencing significant impacts and higher levels of self-harming behaviour, but also keep a sharp focus on older men and men in their 30s, 40s and 50s who have the highest rates of suicide in this country. 

Our approach must work in urban centres as well as rural and remote communities and it must include a focus on the groups that we know to experience disproportionate impacts. This includes, but is not limited to, the LGBTQI community, those from a culturally and linguistically diverse background and groups such as veterans, emergency services workers, caregivers and those bereaved by suicide and communities impacted by multiple adversities. 

There is no doubt that we must empower Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to drive their own solutions to suicide – bringing the best of social and emotional wellbeing, healing, community and clinical approaches together. We recognise that local knowledge and cultural leadership and governance are key.  

A truly whole-of-government and whole-of-community approach will help us to achieve all of this, but we must have the right structures and enablers in place. This includes lived experience knowledge and leadership as central to the approach, growing and developing the workforce to ensure compassionate and contemporary approaches are used across all touch points, and a much stronger use of data, agreed outcomes and evidence to set priorities and drive accountability. It also means having the right governance at the national and regional level to drive a truly coordinated approach.

What I have witnessed this year is a genuine commitment and goodwill across government portfolios and across our organisations and communities to work together. In many ways, the COVID-19 response has shown what is possible when the health and wellbeing of a nation is everyone’s priority. The Interim Advice builds on that commitment and goodwill, but the time to shift our approach is now.

I am looking forward to working with governments, the suicide prevention sector, other agencies and communities over the coming weeks to test and refine the recommendations.  

I would like the thank the many individuals, organisations and advisory groups we have engaged with this year and also thank those who have contributed to research inputs informing the advice. 

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

“Brainstorm – never give up” – Watch this, wise, wonderful & inspiring

Young people talk about mental health issues and how they rise above them.

Gympie Flexible Learning Centre

I posted this a couple of years ago. But now I have managed to embed it in the post. It is from my youtube saved things.

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Interim National Commissioner for Defence and Veteran Suicide Prevention appointed and more comprehensive data and evidence available from this week

Life in Mind Australia

https://lifeinmind.org.au/news/interim-national-commissioner-for-defence-and-veteran-suicide-prevention-appointed-and-more-comprehensive-data-and-evidence-available-from-this-week

Posted 2nd October 2020 in Updates from the Prime Minister’s National Suicide Prevention Adviser

It has been a significant week for suicide prevention in Australia, with the announcement of an interim National Commissioner for Defence and Veteran Suicide Prevention, the public website for the National Suicide and Self-Harm Monitoring System launched and a range of other significant reports released.

Interim Commissioner a welcomed announcement

On Wednesday, the Attorney-General announced the appointment of Dr Bernadette Boss, CSC, as the interim National Commissioner for Defence and Veteran Suicide Prevention. 

While my role as the Prime Minister’s Suicide Prevention Adviser will stay focused on developing options to improve the whole of government coordination and delivery of suicide prevention activities across portfolios, the specific focus on defence personnel, veterans and their families is welcomed.

The appointment of an interim Commissioner can only strengthen our national approach to suicide prevention.

Subject to passage of legislation currently before the Parliament, Dr Boss’ role will be formalised as the National Commissioner with powers broadly equivalent to a Royal Commission to:

  • Inquire into the circumstances of past and future ADF member and veteran deaths by suicide, including suspected deaths by suicide
  • Hear about the impact of ADF member and veteran deaths by suicide on families and others who are affected
  • Make findings and recommendations to the Australian Government
  • Promote the understanding of suicide risks for ADF members and veterans, and factors that can improve the wellbeing of ADF members and veterans.

I look forward to working with Dr Bernadette Boss, CSC, to ensure that our broader review and advice can inform and support the work of the Commissioner going forward, meaning that Australians get the right support at the right time. 

More information about the Commissioner’s work and Terms of Reference are available at: www.nationalcommissionerdvsp.gov.au 

Improved and timely data now available 

On Tuesday, I joined Matthew James, Deputy CEO of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare to launch the public website of the National Suicide and Self-Harm Monitoring System.  

The system brings together for the first time, suicide and self-harm data into a single platform with the data sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, government health departments, coronial offices, emergency services as well as research studies and national survey data.  

Having reliable and timely data to draw on is critical to our national suicide prevention work so that governments and services can be agile in their response to emerging issues and make investments where it will have the greatest benefit. This is important for our long-term planning but also as we continue to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The website is only one part of the overall project. Data improvement and enhanced data sharing is also a key part of the system. A key goal of the National Suicide and Self-Harm Monitoring System is to establish suicide registers in all jurisdictions. Registers currently exist in Victoria, Queensland, Tasmania, and Western Australia with plans to establish a register in New South Wales by October 2020. The AIHW is working with South Australia, the Australian Capital Territory, and the Northern Territory to help establish registers in these jurisdictions. The monitoring system is also supporting the establishment of the National Ambulance Surveillance System (NASS), a world-first public health monitoring system that will provide timely and comprehensive data on ambulance attendances for suicide attempts, suicidal ideation, self-injury, and mental health.

To access the site, visit: www.aihw.gov.au/suicide-self-harm-monitoring

Sector reports reinforce the need for a whole of government approach

This week, Black Dog Institute released a Suicide Prevention White Paper and recently Suicide Prevention Australia released their State of the Nation in Suicide Prevention report.  

Both of these are worth a read, and support the need for a more comprehensive, more compassionate and more coordinated response to suicide prevention in Australia. What I have witnessed this year is a genuine commitment and goodwill across government portfolios and across our organisations and communities to work together.

It is only through this shared commitment, drawing on knowledge and expertise from those with a lived experience of suicide, that lasting impacts can be achieved for individuals and communities.

I am sure these reports, and others released this year, will contribute to further robust discussions that are needed in suicide prevention.

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families