Mind in QLD

http://www.mindaustralia.org.au/services/queensland

At the recent 20th International Mental Health Conference on the Gold Coast, I found out about some wonderful mental health care services in the non-government sector. Here is one of them..

Mind is a registered NDIS provider. Our Centre for Mental Health and Wellbeing (located in Ipswich, but servicing a wider area) delivers specialised allied health support to people with complex needs due to their mental health related disability, or dual disability (intellectual, autism, or acquired brain injury). We also offer support to our clients’ families, carers and support teams. People in Queensland are also reminded they can access information and advice by calling Mind Connect on 1300 286 463 (1300 AT MIND) or the Carer Helpline on 1300 554 660. Our online discussion forums are another great way to get support. Participation in Mind services is voluntary

Call us on 1300 286 463

In QLD, Mind offers 8 residential services…

4 Step-Up – Step Down Services

Adult Step Up – Step Down services are short stay, sub-acute recovery care, delivered through Mind partnerships with hospital networks. This service provides short term (up to 28 days) support in a residential setting, providing an alternative to hospitalisation (step up) or transition from hospital back into the community (step down). Residents can access specialist (clinical) mental health staff 24 hours a day, while also being supported to enhance connections with family and friends, and their capacity for living in the community. This service provides a schedule of group activities alongside individual 1:1 support based on your strengths and goals as identified in your individual recovery plan.

Who for: People who need short term intensive recovery support to help them transition out of an acute mental health facility or to help them avoid hospitalisation.

How to access: Access is through the clinical provider and facilitated through psychiatric assessment.

Outcome statement: Stabilised mental health and the skills to live safely in the community.

Community based residential recovery care – CAIRNS 1300 286 463

Community based residential recovery care services offering support to people who are transitioning out of long-term hospital rehabiliation units, operated in partnership with hospitals

Community based residential recovery care – GAILES 1300 286 463

Community based residential recovery care – TOOWOOMBA 1300 286 463

Step Up Step Down service – BUNDABERG 1300 286 463

Step Up Step Down service – CAIRNS 1300 286 463

Step Up Step Down service – GLADSTONE and CENTRAL QUEENSLAND REGION 1300 286 463

Step Up Step Down service – MACKAY 1300 286 463

NDIS service Supported Independent Living – YAMANTO 1300 286 463

Supported independent living services for participants in the NDIS whose ability to live independently is impacted by mental health related disability or dual disability. Our residential services are provided in a home-like setting. Our aim is to support each person to gain the confidence and skills to live independently in the community.

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20th International Mental Health Conference 2nd Aug 19 Peerworker Session 3

Friday 2nd August 2019 Day 3 Workshop Final Session Q & A Panel Discussion

I think the Gold Coast is leading the way…. amazing group of people

#Mitch Wallis Chair: Mental health Founder & CEO of ‘Hearts on my sleeve’ https://au.linkedin.com/in/mitchwallis

#Ms Michelle Edwards: Carer Consultant, Gold Coast Health, Co-Chair of Gold Coast Peer Workforce Network

#Ms Melissa Thurley: Youth Engagement Coordinator, headspace Early Psychosis Program, S-E QLD, Youth Peer Support Worker, headspace Southport

#Ms Angela Davies: Consumer Consultant, Gold Coast Health, Co-Chair of Gold Coast Peer Workforce Network

#Gabrielle Vilic: Director Social Inclusion & Recovery, Addiction & Mental Health Services, Metro Sth Addiction & Mental Health QLD

#Ms Paula Arro: Lived Experience Engagement Coordinator, Brisbane Nth PHN

#Mr Matt Caruna: Presenter “Behind the smile” https://www.facebook.com/matthew918/

🎧 Take a Listen | New Mental Health Podcast Channel

Australian & New Zealand Mental Health Association

Episode #1: Q&A with Lucy Brogden,
National Mental Health Commissioner

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR PREMIERE PODCAST CHANNEL

Pebble in the Pond is a podcast that hopes to create a ripple for change for mental health. 

Listen in as we interview the most fascinating and accomplished people in mental health, from lived experience speakers through to researchers, academics and influential industry leaders.

LISTEN NOW ON ANCHOR https://anchor.fm/pebbleinthepond

Suicide Prevention PhD Scholarships in Australia

Suicide Prevention Australia

Applications are now open for PhD Scholarships

Applications are now open for Suicide Prevention Australia’s PhD Scholarships. 

The PhD Scholarship provides up to $105,000 to support outstanding graduates who are at the early part of their research career in suicide prevention.

Applications close 23:59 (AEST) Thursday 15 August 2019. 

Visit the website for more information on the scholarship, including guidelines and application form. 

If you have enquiries regarding the research grant program please contact Suicide Prevention Australia on +61 (2) 9262 1130 or email sprf@suicidepreventionaust.org

Kindly forward to interested colleagues.

Melbourne University

PhD Scholarship – Youth Self Harm & Suicide (ED)

https://mdhs.unimelb.edu.au/our-organisation/institutes-centres-departments/cymh/news-and-events/phd-scholarship-youth-self-harm-and-suicide-ed

Centre for Research Excellence in Suicide Prevention (CRESP)

PhD Scholarship – Suicide

https://mdhs.unimelb.edu.au/our-organisation/institutes-centres-departments/cymh/news-and-events/phd-scholarship-centre-of-research-excellence-in-suicide-prevention-cresp

Please feel free to distribute to others who you think may be interested.

The Project Team, National Leadership in Suicide Prevention Research. The University of Melbourne

AISRAP Special Lecture: Dr. Julie Cerel

Director of Doctoral Programs, University of Kentucky, Past President, American Association of Suicidology, Personal & professional exposure to suicide

Dr. Julie Cerel PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist and Professor in the College of Social Work at the University of Kentucky. Her research has focused on suicide exposure/bereavement, suicide attempt survivors and suicide prevention.  She completed her PhD from The Ohio State University, an internship and post-doctoral fellowship from West Virginia University and a post-doctoral fellowship specifically in suicide prevention from University of Rochester. She has also served as President, Research Division Chair and Board Chair of the American Association of Suicidology (AAS).

She is the author of over 65 academic publications and co-author of Seeking Hope: Stories of the Suicide Bereaved. Her work has been funded by the Military Suicide Research Consortium from the United States Department of Defense, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA), Suicide Prevention Action Network USA and American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP). She is an Editorial Board Member for Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior. Dr. Cerel mentors and collaborates with a diverse group of undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students at UK and internationally. Her work on suicide exposure has recently been expanded to examine the correlates and consequences of work-related suicide exposure for law enforcement officers, first responders, mental health professionals and other workers.

When: Thursday 20th June 2019

Details:
2:15 pm  Arrival, tea and coffee
2:30 pm  Lecture commences
3:15 pm  Discussion, Q & A
3:30 pm  Networking and refreshments
4:00 pm  Conclusion

Price: $30 incl GST – includes afternoon tea.  
RSVP: Please register and pay online by COB Monday 17 June 2019 to
ensure your place.  
Registration can be completed via Griffith Pay; you may need to register
an account. Please email aisrap@griffith.edu.au should you require
assistance.  

This event will not be recorded or webcast.

https://app.secure.griffith.edu.au/griffithpay/guest-lecture-dr-julie-cerel.html

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10 am-10 pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Key Dates for Research Grants Opportunities

Suicide Prevention Australia Member Alert June 2019

The 2019 Suicide Prevention Research Fund Grants Program is well
underway.

Innovation Research Grants Expressions of Interest period opened on 
15 May and close on 15 June. Applications for the PhD Scholarships and 
Post-Doctoral Fellowships open 1 July 2019.

Register your interest below and visit the website for further details.

Innovation Research Grants
Expressions of Interest close 15 June 2019
Apply here

PhD Scholarships
Applications open 1 July and close 15 August 2019
Register your interest

Post-Doctoral Fellowships
Applications open 1 July and close 31 August 2019

Register your interest Suicide Prevention Australia remembers those we
have lost to suicide and acknowledges the suffering suicide brings when
it touches our lives. We are brought together by experience and are
unified by hope.

Suicide Prevention Australia acknowledges the traditional owners of
country throughout Australia, and their continuing connections to land,
sea and community. We pay our respects to them and their cultures, and
to elders past, present and emerging.
Quality, Innovation & Research National Conference Research Grants
Get Help
Copyright © 2018 Suicide Prevention Australia, All rights
reserved.

Our mailing address is:
membership@suicidepreventionaust.org

Hanging out in emergency is no place for people experiencing psyche-ache

Susan Murray CEO Zero Suicide Institute of Australasia, 30th March 2019

https://www.zerosuicide.com.au/post/hanging-out-in-emergency-is-no-place-for-people-experiencing-psyche-ache

Having immersed myself over the last six years in suicide prevention, and to a degree mental health, I might be considered a bit of a “Johnny-come-lately” to this area, but it doesn’t make me any less concerned about how we can and should be improving services. Last week the Australian Institute of Health & Welfare (AIHW) released the report on Mental Health Services in Australia.It is full of stats and facts which can be used to guide decisions around programs, services and resourcing.

There are many who have been advocating for years to find better options for supporting those who are in crisis. Skimming the data in this report gives every good reason as to why we must move on this now.

In 2106-17 there were 276,954 people who arrived at emergency departments across Australia for mental ill-health conditions. A staggering 6 out of every 10 were not admitted to hospital ….that’s almost 158,000 who did not get admitted to the hospital they attended.

What this says to me is ……. if we provided alternative quality care to de-escalate the immediate crisis and then supported the person to get the right ongoing care we could make a real difference:……

  • To each of the 158,000 individuals
  • To the emergency department nurses and doctors who we all know are stretched to the hilt
  • To the distressed family members and carers
  • To the administrators who are constantly being told to cut costs

By transforming services to non-hospitalised professional care in a living-room style environment it has been demonstrated to focus the individual on recovery and to save health systems up to 45% of their current costs.

I visited one such centre on a recent study tour in the US. It takes a lot to set up and get the best results. But, the results speak for themselves – and are well worth the effort.

The Commonwealth Government has allocated $1.45 billion to the Primary Health Networks over the next three years. Surely the opportunity to transform the mental health services is there. Let’s grab it and run with some trials in urban, regional and rural areas.

I am happy to help. Let’s get things moving.

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10 am-10 pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

The Rotterdam Statement – Zero Suicide

moving beyond the tipping point

Preface

On September 3 – 4, 2018, more than 100 leaders from nearly 20 countries convened at the Zero Suicide International 4 summit in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Here they designed the revision of the 2015 International Zero Suicide Declaration. The declaration you are about to read now clarifies the commitment of these leaders to improve healthcare suicide prevention as a complement to public health and community suicide prevention initiatives.

What is Zero Suicide Healthcare?

Rooted in universal human values and based on scientific evidence Zero Suicide Healthcare is a worldwide emergent transformative approach that aims for a shift of mindset in healthcare and society: from passive acceptance to active prevention. Its inspirational goal drives healthcare systems to continually improve the quality of care. Zero Suicide offers healthcare leaders clear strategies and principles to learn to protect ever more patients, relatives and staff against the tragedy of suicide.

For those who turn to healthcare Zero Suicide offers a better experience when feeling suicidal. They will experience that suicidality can be discussed openly, is treated directly and managed in a least restrictive, recovery-oriented way. As they transition through the system they have chosen, no person falls through the cracks. Zero Suicide Healthcare is not an isolated strategy. It is a complement to other community-based suicide prevention initiatives which will be running simultaneously.

Why is it important?

Because lives, many lives, are at stake. More than 800, 000 people die of suicide every year. Evidence shows that many more suicides are prevented in healthcare systems which provide better suicide prevention care. Radical system transformation can drive down suicide rates to zero. Knowing this, there is no time to lose. To make inroads we need systemic change.

Who is it for?

First, it is for healthcare leaders across the globe. They are the drivers of the Zero Suicide Healthcare model and within their system protectors of a safe and just culture of learning and improving. Second, it is for all staff working in healthcare. Working in a Zero Suicide organization they are well trained and supported to provide excellent suicide prevention care; and feel safe to find and repair root causes underlying adverse events. Last but not least, it is for all partners, for governments and politicians; media; industries and employers; public  health and suicide prevention organizations; persons with lived experience and scientists. With their force, expertise and willingness they partner together with healthcare systems to move the needle and drive down population suicide rates.

The Rotterdam Declaration

The Rotterdam Declaration is supported by healthcare leaders who attended the Summit. We urge all to join the growing international learning community and use this Declaration to find the tipping points in your healthcare system that will deliver the change you want to see. Bold visions have put a man on the moon and eradicated polio. There’s no more time for half measures. Only with insightful leadership committed to the pursuit of Zero Suicide, will we be able to make strides towards this important vision.

David W. Covington, LPC, MBA Dr. Jan Mokkenstorm
RI International, USA               113 Suicide Prevention, the Netherlands

                  

The Rotterdam Declaration    

Every minute of every day suicide impacts the lives of hundreds of people across the globe. It robs families of loved ones, young people of their future, workplaces of colleagues and communities of their most valuable resource – their people.

We, the participants at the fourth Zero Suicide International summit in Rotterdam September 2018, and representing a diverse group of healthcare leaders, academic institutions, civil society, the private sector, governments and persons with lived experience:

Accept: The World Health Organization Report: Preventing Suicide: a global imperative key message: Suicides are preventable. For national responses to be effective a comprehensive multi-sectoral suicide prevention strategy is needed and this should include making suicide prevention a core responsibility of health systems, with collaboration between health and non-health sectors at governmental and non-governmental levels.i

Acknowledge:  Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which says the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is a fundamental human right.ii

Recognise: The United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (3) which targets by 2030, a reduction by one third of premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being. Measured by the suicide mortality rate.iii

Understand: The devastating impact that suicides have on the health workforce, families, workplaces and communities.

The Zero Suicide Healthcare Framework

The model offers both a realistic and effective approach to eliminating suicides. Zero Suicide Healthcare is a systematic, leadership-driven, continuous quality improvement approach to reducing suicides in care. The framework equips institutions with training, access to evidence-based treatments and supports and care pathways that have demonstrated exceptional results in healthcare systems.

We commit to:

Leadership centred on a just, safety-driven culture informed by evidence and lived expertise

  • Health systems leaders create a culture founded on a relentless pursuit to prevent suicide. We believe a suicide event (attempt or death) is an avoidable outcome of care in a modern healthcare setting.
  • Recovery, healing, learning and improvement after losing a patient to suicide are integral to the culture of the healthcare system. Blame, punishment or retribution is unacceptable
  • Hospital and healthcare staff are compassionate, confident and competent as they identify and care for those with suicidal behaviour.

A teamwork approach when engaging those who are suicidal

  • For those who seek help through healthcare systems, their pain and distress is acknowledged in a timely, respectful and caring manner, free from discrimination
  • Person-centred, treatment-oriented screening and assessment for suicidality is practised, including direct enquiry regarding suicidal thoughts and behaviours
  • Interventions include direct treatment for suicidality in the least restrictive settings using collaborative, research-informed practice techniques including safety planning and caring contacts.
  • Care management is determined through productive patient/staff interactions
  • Decisions from one level of care (e.g., hospital care) are communicated in a timely way to other necessary levels of care (e.g., intensive outpatient, private therapist, pharmacological therapy).

Active participation of patients, health professionals and family members or carers in safety planning and transition to aftercare

  • Active involvement in safety planning, including means restriction, ahead of being discharged from care. This will include where possible active engagement and education for family members and loved ones
  • Shared service responsibilities and communication between clinical staff within the hospital and providers in the wider community
  • Active outreach from the hospital before the next  appointment
  • Peer support offered from within the hospital system and through community-based support services.

Data and implementation science deliver continuous improvement

  • Continuous quality improvement has its foundations in data collection and analysis and importantly, its application
  • Open access to data is available within the constraints of privacy legislation
  • Clinicians and teams use data to monitor ongoing performance, refine services and evaluate impact, always with a view to enabling improved outcomes
  • Learning is facilitated through expansion of new and ongoing implementation approaches across the world and a commitment to shared learning through publication of outcomes
  • New approaches are explored and supported through increased investment in research, particularly translational & implementation science research for real-world relevance.

Synergy in collaborative networks with general and public healthcare or community suicide prevention initiatives.

Conclusion

For healthcare systems: efficiency without quality is unthinkable. Quality without efficiency is unsustainable. The Zero Suicide Healthcare model represents quality and efficiency – it is the synthesis of ambition and science.

Zero Suicide Healthcare represents joined up care so that no person need die alone and in despair from suicide.

Need more information

ZeroSuicide.org for global learning community.

ZeroSuicide.com for fidelity toolkit & resources

  1. World Health Organization: Preventing Suicide: a global imperative. Page 9. Luxembourg 2014
  2. Universal Declaration of Human Rights; http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/
  3. United Nations Sustainable Development Goals https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdg3#targets
  4. Kruk M et al; The Lancet Global Health – High-quality health systems in the Sustainable Development Goals era: time for a revolution, The Lancet Vol 392, September 2018.

The Ozzies

#Lucinda Brogden, #Jacinta Hawgood, #Mathew Large, #Sue Murray, #Alan Woodward #Helena Christensen

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10 am-10 pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families