Marooned (Part 2)

A powerful Australian play that is cheap to stage, easy to tour, and works

When the Wolves tour this play, everyone stays behind after the performance and so that people in the audience can talk and have their say. Each community brings their own mental health people/workers along to spread the message in the community.

It is a great way to open up conversations about suicide prevention in your community. Give Michael a ring to discuss how you could bring “Marooned” to your community

Synopsis 

The story is simple, four Australians, from four different demographics are stuck in a waiting room in heaven. They have all taken their own lives and apparently failed. God never speaks to them, instead he leaves them to their own devices to discover what it is they must do to get out.  That is not only talking but listening. As they become closer they all find their second wind and start heading back, except one character, a man in his early fifties, who turned up broken but at the end is hungry to get home to his family and start living. Sadly, once alone, he discovers his attempt has been successful and he’s not going anywhere. This twist rams home the nightmare of suicide and while it leaves the audience stunned, the play itself leaves them uplifted.     

After every show they hang around and talk openly and warmly about their own stories and suicide. If mental health professionals are there to harness all this positivity, then these conversations are a breeding ground for change.

We are not a mental health charity, we are a not for profit theatre company who are happy to work with all groups who deal with this issue.

The play can be staged anywhere from a theatre to a barn, even outside.

Please contact the Chief of Army for an assessment.

But for now, we want to get this play on the road doing what it was written to do and doing it cost effectively.

Regards

Michael Gray Griffith

0425854943

Simon McKeon: Australian of the Year 2011 and a Rio Tinto Board member, has been instrumental in having Rio Tinto fully sponsor the North Queensland Tour of the play.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Av7uLNsA0A8&t=28s

Michael states:

“It was an interesting week. We had a lovely call from a man working at Suicide Prevention Australia. He informed us about how they work and congratulated us on the unfolding story of Marooned. He told us he felt it should be touring nationally. He then directed us to some other organisations who may be interested in aligning with us. So, fingers crossed.

Then after that a woman from a Victorian Primary Health Network called and we shared a similar conversation with her.

The lovely thing was finally being able to have a conversation with active members from the Suicide Prevention Community and let them know that we are interested in having the piece evaluated as a new tool in the fight. “

BOOK NOW
The Alex Theatre23rd & 24th April.1/135 Fitzroy Street, St Kilda VIC 3182,Eventbrite Marooned
BOOK FOR THE ALEX THEATRE
Kingston Arts Centre. 979 Nepean Highway, MoorabbinSat 1 May 7:30PM
BOOK FOR KINGSTON
MAROONED IN TASSIEJune 5th & 6th LauncestonBooking Link Soon

A play about suicide that needs to be seen.

Initially rehearsed in a living room, from its opening night in a small theatre in Prahran, Marooned has been warmly accepted. It has toured parts of regional Victoria where it has attracted standing ovations and a loyal following.

The MTC invited The Wolves Theatre to stage it in one of their theatres, then the Chief of Army invited them to stage it for the Chain of Command in Canberra.

Now Covid willing, in September 2021 a National Conference in the UK will wrap up their conference with Marooned.

It’s been called a revolution by a top army psychologist and has also attracted the backing of a former Australian of the year, Simon McKeon.

Set in a waiting room in the afterlife, it focuses on the souls of four very different strangers who are bored and regretful and want to get out of this room and go home, but how? Maybe there is something they have to do. But what? Apart from the seats, the only thing in this room is each other.

“Marooned is undoubtedly the finest piece of theatre I’ve seen in many years. It had me in tears and belly laughing. Beautifully written and expertly performed. Stunningly good.” ~Megan Watts.

“This is an important play,” ~Alan Hopgood. “While I can see the influences of Harold Pinter, this is not Pinter.

This is an original voice”, ~Bruce Beresford

I laughed, I cried, I felt. It’s raw and extremely real.The actors are beyond amazing, the writing is phenomenal. It was an occasional shifting of bodies that brought you back to the reality that reminded you that this was a play. ~Natalie Powel

Marooned (Part 1)

“This play captures your attention all the way through. It is challenging yet compassionate in its take on this difficult topic, suicide. Seeing this play opens up the conversation for us all, about a topic that has been hidden for a long time” Olivia Wong, Psychiatrist.

https://www.wolvestheatre.com/so/12NNYboLF#/main

A good news suicide prevention story

Initially this original Australian play was meant to have a short season in a small theatre in Melbourne as a dedication to our friend, an actor who took his life.

But instead it resonated so deeply with audiences it was clear that it was something special. Night after night audiences would hang around after the play wanting to talk openly, warmly and proactively about suicide and its prevention.  And many of these people from Barristers to Pensioners urged us to take it everywhere.

Suicide prevention conferences achieve these positive and communal conversations but usually after a day or two, while this play achieves the same result after only 90 minutes.

And this conversation that it initiates is why the regional towns are taking the play. 

More importantly it’s the reason The AUSTRALIAN ARMY is to tour the play to all their bases. 

James The boat builder who brought Marooned to Corowa

Synopsis

The story is simple, four Australians, from four different demographics are stuck in a waiting room in heaven. They have all taken their own lives and apparently failed. God never speaks to them, instead he leaves them to their own devices to discover what it is they must do to get out.  That is not only talking but listening. As they become closer they all find their second wind and start heading back, except one character, a man in his early fifties, who turned up broken but at the end is hungry to get home to his family and start living. Sadly, once alone, he discovers his attempt has been successful and he’s not going anywhere. This twist rams home the nightmare of suicide and while it leaves the audience stunned, the play itself leaves them uplifted.     

After every show they hang around and talk openly and warmly about their own stories and suicide. If mental health professionals are there to harness all this positivity, then these conversations are a breeding ground for change.

We are not a mental health charity, we are a not for profit theatre company who are happy to work with all groups who deal with this issue.

The towns themselves can put it on for free, or charge and use it as a fundraiser.

The play can be staged anywhere from a theatre to a barn, even outside.

Please contact the Chief of Army for an assessment.

But for now, we want to get this play on the road doing what it was written to do and doing it cost effectively.

Regards

Michael Gray Griffith 0425854943

The Wedge Theatre, Sale.

Corowa Town Hall

Yarrawonga  Town Hall

Red Rock Regional Theatre

Canberra, Army Headquaters

Franskston

Camberwell

Prahan MC Showroom

MTC

The Palace Hotel

Towns Booked 

  • Ballarat
  • Launceston
  • Finley 
  • Paroo
  • Bega 
  • Grandlston
  • Canarvon
  • Berrigan 
Noel Thomas who brought Marooned to Yarrawonga
Graham Blumfield who brought the play to Frankston

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14 https://www.lifeline.org.au/

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Giving Men a Hand: The case for a male suicide prevention strategy

Australian Men’s Health Forum

Poole, G., 2020. Giving Men A Hand: The case for a National Plan to Prevent Male Suicide. Sydney: Australian Men’s Health Forum.
AMHF receives funding from the Australian Government.

CONTENTS

Thinking Differently About Male Suicide Page 1

The Facts About Male Suicide Page 2

10 Ways Male Suicide is Different Page 3

The Case For A National Plan To Prevent Male Suicide Page 4

5 Reasons We Need A Plan To Prevent Male Suicide Page 5

Moving Beyond Mental Health Page 6

Focusing On Life Crises Page 7

5 Risk Factors For Male Suicide Page 8

Looking Out For Men At Risk Page 10

Social Factors that Shape Male Suicide Page 12

Barriers To Preventing Male Suicide Page 14

Making Suicide Prevention Services Male-Friendly Page 16

10-Step Guide to Developing Male-Centred Health Programs Page 17

Five Actions to Prevent Male Suicide Page 18

“A recent analysis of Government-funded suicide prevention projects by the Australian Men’s Health Forum found that while 75% of suicides are male, the majority of Government-funded suicide prevention initiatives are more effective at reaching women (AMHF 2020).
These include StandBy (80% female clients); Kids Helpline
(77%); Beyond Blue’s Way Back Support Service (60%); headspace (60%) and Lifeline (around 60%).” Page 15.

Let’s Keep Preventing Female Suicide
While this report focuses on the need to prevent male suicide, work to prevent suicide should be gender inclusive and take into account the needs of women, girls and gender diverse people too. Page 5.

https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/amhf/pages/1237/attachments/original/1616117359/MENS_HEALTH_Giving_Men_a_Hand__FINAL_V4_SINGLE.pdf?1616117359

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14 https://www.lifeline.org.au/

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Mary O’Brien’s “Are You Bogged Mate?” Program

Profiled on ABC’s Landline

Recognition for Mary O’Brien’s Are You Bogged Mate? program continues to gain traction. Following her recent double gong victories in the Australian Men’s Health Forum’s National Men’s Health Awards for 2020, Mary was featured in the ABC’s highly rated Landline, which focuses on stories in outback Australia.

Mary tells reporter Pip Courtney that she started Are You Bogged Mate? two years ago after two local men died of suicide in her hometown Dalby, three hours west of Brisbane.

Having spent her life travelling the country giving spray drift workshops to grain-growers, and growing up on a sheep property, she had developed a deep understanding of rural blokes and how to reach them.

“They are a very special breed, and they are certainly worth looking after,” she said.

Mary quotes statistics on male suicide, and says they scare the hell out of her.

“Six men a day in this country take their own life and two women. Rural men are twice as likely to take their own life as metropolitan men. In the 20-24-year-old age bracket, 40% of those young men that die are by suicide.”

When Mary developed her suicide prevention and mental health awareness program, she chose to deliver her message in relatable language and farming metaphors, likening depression to a machine getting bogged.

“If you red-line your machine all the time, it’s going to blow up,” she tells a group of rural blokes in a big open farm shed.

As one farmer states, “the analogy between mental health and seeking assistance is just brilliant.”

Psychologists and participants interviewed on the show say Mary is bridging the gap between mainstream health services that ‘don’t fit in with what communities need,’ and blokes. “On a daily basis, Mary saves lives,” claims Dervla Loughnan, who runs a virtual text-based counselling service.

Farmer Stuart Armitage was one of those blokes, who suffered deeply through the 2011 floods. “She’s on the same level as us and that’s the way we like it.”

Are You Bogged Mate? recently gain charity status and is paving the way to get sponsorship.  

“Services are missing getting the blokes in,” says Mary. “There is a still a stigma there. I hope I can break down some of those barriers and put it into ‘bloke-speak’ or farmer speak.”

She told Landline the AMHF Men’s Health Awards had been a special moment of recognition.

Mary won the overall Qld Men’s Health Award and the National Women Working in Men’s Health Award.

“That was awesome it was really humbling. And hopefully it just shines a bit more of a spotlight on rural men’s mental health and how important these guys are.”

https://www.amhf.org.au/are_you_bogged_mate_profiled_on_abc_s_landline

Take Action for Men’s Health

View Mary O’Brien story on Landline (ABC 28:55) (about half-way through the program at the 30 minute mark)

Read: National 2020 Men’s Health Award winners announced (AMHF)

Read: Mary O’Brien wins Qld Men’s Health Award (AMHF)

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14 https://www.lifeline.org.au/

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families