QLD Mental Health Consumer Peak Steering Committee

Safe Hands: Members of the Project Steering Committee have been appointed. Meet the team here. The committee will guide and inform the establishment of a new consumer mental health peak body in Queensland.

Ivan Frkovic (Co-chair and Commissioner, Queensland Mental Health Commission)

I came to Australia from Croatia and grew up in Ipswich – I now live in Forestdale. I have about 28 years’ experience in the mental health sector, in government and non-government sectors, and mainly in service delivery, funding and policy.

I choose to be a part of the committee because I truly believe that it is vitally important to ensure that people with a lived experience have genuine and meaningful input into all aspects of mental health, including service delivery, funding, policy, etc.

As co-chair my aim is to ensure that the steering committee takes into consideration lived experience from the outset in the establishment of the consumer peak.

My secret talent: I love singing, enjoy all music and Croatian dancing – not sure about it being linked to talent?

Rebecca Johnson (Co-chair and lived experience representative)

I’m from Bundaberg, Queensland and currently live in Brisbane. I have been an active part of national and state conversations in mental health and suicide prevention for more than 10 years. I’m a proud Aboriginal and Australian South Sea Islander woman; my passion for being an advocate for changes within diverse mental health systems flows from not only my own lived experience, but also from listening to the stories of many people from some of the most vulnerable populations and communities. I am committed to ensuring that these voices remain at the forefront of any conversation, co-design or collaboration that aims to improve the mental health and wellbeing of our Queensland communities. I am also an award recipient of the national Out for Australia award for my leadership and role modelling in LGBTIQ advocacy and inclusion.

I chose to join the committee to promote a broader community understanding of consumer and/or lived experience inclusion in policy and organisational development. As co-chair, I hope we achieve a natural cascade of co-designing the Queensland mental health consumer representation peak: a deeper community understanding that consumers and/or people with a lived experience want other Queenslanders to know their perspectives are heard, valued and validated, in a way that improves self-care and safer service accessibility.

My secret talent is that I’m a keen guitar technician and lyric writer.

Bretine Curtis (Interim Executive Director, Queensland Mental Health Commission)

My 25 years of experience in mental health, alcohol and other drugs and suicide prevention are underscored by my passion for systems and service improvement. Before joining the Commission in early 2019, I held senior leadership positions in the West Moreton Hospital and Health Service. I’ve led mental health education across Queensland, including work to support forensic mental health service clinical risk assessment and information packages.  

Dr Erin Evans (Representative from Health Consumers Queensland)

I’m from West End, Brisbane. I’m the Chair of Health Consumers Queensland, and chair the Queensland Genomics Community Group. I was a member of the steering committee that oversaw the scoping project for the mental health consumer organisation in 2019 that led to this current work. I’m delighted to continue involvement in this important organisation’s establishment. On a personal note, I also have been a carer for family members.

I have a PhD in biotech novel drug design and an MBA and works internationally as an executive in the biotech sector and NGOs. I specialise in working with leaders and organisations around the world to navigate uncertainty and deliver complex projects.

I am passionate about the role of consumers in all aspects of health and also in organisational governance and development. This role on the committee brings these two together.

In this role, I hope to support the development of a sustainable, resilient organisation that serves and adapts to the needs of consumers with mental health care needs for decades to come. It needs to be an organisation that the consumers own and feel represents their needs and voice.

My secret talent: I love Latin dancing and up to a few years ago enjoyed performing as a samba girl. Maybe post-COVID isolation, who knows???

Irene Clelland (Representing Lived Experience Australia – formerly Arafmi)

I live in West End, Brisbane but am originally from Glasgow in Scotland. I have nine years’ experience in mental health in Queensland working in mental health and disability orgs (all NGOs), and am currently CEO of a medium-sized NGO that supports carers. I have another 14 years’ experience in Scotland in NGO and policy advocacy roles in local government. I have also been a consumer, receiving mental health services – mostly in Scotland but also proactive supports in Queensland. In my spare time have been involved in multiple committees and projects, with the most recent being a Queensland committee member of the Pinnacle Foundation who provide educational and vocational support to young adults across Australia where their gender identity, sexual orientation or sexual characteristics have prevented or hindered achievement of their career aspirations or personal development. I also provide mental health awareness training to various different organisations. Personally, I am a retired international hockey umpire (over 100 international caps), pug lover, and have a lived experienced of recovery from mental illness.

I choose to join the committee because it’s an exciting and important opportunity to try and shift the mental health landscape in Queensland.

I’m not sure yet what I hope to achieve in this role – achievement is a team decision and focus – I’m happy to contribute to what ‘achievement’ might look like.

My secret talent: I always correctly guess the ‘baddie’ within 10 minutes of watching a crime thriller or murder mystery (it’s annoying).

Dr Dave Scott (Lived experience representative)

I’m from Cleveland, on the Redlands Coast. I have living experience of mental ill-health, and bring to the steering committee my experiences in community development roles in First Nations communities in Canada and community networks on the Redlands Coast.

I chose to be a part of this committee because I have a passion for participatory design programs that empower those with lived experience to influence decisions that affect them. As a person with lived experience this is my opportunity to advocate based on my experiences with the sector.

I hope this role helps me to achieve better outcomes for people who have experienced trauma as a child, and for those who are disengaged with the mental health system due to social inhibitors.

My goal is to work as hard as I can to change conditions that hold social problems in place.

Melissa Pietzner (Lived experience representative)

I’m from Mackay, and have been a consumer of health services in Queensland for 22 years. I worked with the Child Support Agency before moving to London, where I became a consumer of NHS UK health services. My advocacy work started in London when I joined my local NHS Foundation Trust. When I returned to my home town of Mackay, I volunteered with a local Community Health Reference Group. Since then I’ve become involved with a variety of local, state and national steering committees.  

I chose to be a part of this committee because I’m passionate about lived experience-led reform and tailoring services to better serve the unique needs of individual communities, and to support Australia to collaborate with other countries and share knowledge and expertise in health care

In my role, I hope to empower consumers to share stories and work together to build better health services for all, and to contribute to the work being done in integrating both government and non-government services to improve service delivery in rural and regional Queensland. I hope to help the formation of a peak body with a solid foundation it can use to maintain high standards in mental health care and have a positive and lasting influence across Queensland’s mental health services.

Michael Burge AM (Lived experience representative)

I have been advocating for mental health consumers since 1995 on more than 80 local, state, national and international committees and forums. I’ve participated in exchanges and visited over 100 different consumer driven and operated organisations in over 11 countries.

I am among a unique group of peer advocates that have worked full-time in a public mental health service at the grass roots level for many years (19th year). I have a lived experience of mental health as a consumer, carer, Indigenous person, and a veteran. I am often in a mental health unit speaking with consumers one day and representing their perspectives and voices at a local, state, national and international level the next.

I wanted to be part of this committee because I bring a unique, strong and real time consumer viewpoint and perspective: not watered down, not sanitised, and not skewed through numerous layers of bureaucracy.

I also bring extensive experience in the development of many policies, procedures, and constitutions (including at national levels) for consumer-led organisations over many years and want to use my experience to help make the consumer peak a reality for Queensland. 

I hope to be part of achieving the establishment of a strong, proud, effective and representative peak body that provides genuine and meaningful engagement with a diverse range of consumers across the state.

Since 2017 I have been a consumer representative on the board of the World Federation for Mental Health (WFMH) and presented at their congresses in New Delhi (2017), Houston (2018) and Buenos Aires (2019).

My secret talent: I loved speaking Pidgin English during my time in Bougainville 2000.

Sandra Eyre (Senior Director, Mental Health, Alcohol and Other Drugs Branch)

I’m the Senior Director, Mental Health Alcohol and Other Drugs Branch, where my core areas of responsibility encompass strategy, planning and partnerships. In this role, I’ve led development of Connecting Care to Recovery 2016-2021: a plan for Queensland’s mental health alcohol and other drug services andoverseen implementation of the government response to the Barrett Adolescent Centre Commission of Inquiry and associated program work including establishment of the new Jacaranda Place adolescent extended treatment centre.

I’ve also led development the Peer Workforce Support and Development Framework, Lived Experience Engagement and Participation Strategy and the project work associated with consulting and scoping a new consumer organisation.

I have previously worked in senior roles in the Social Policy and Intergovernmental Units at the Department of The Premier and Cabinet and the Strategic Policy Branch, Queensland Health. I have policy expertise across a range of health and social policy areas including national health reform, intergovernmental relations, multicultural health, maternity and women’s health, domestic and sexual violence.

I hold a Bachelor of Social Work and a Bachelor of Business – Communication and has held senior social work positions in hospitals and community health services, the Family Law Court and the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (NSW).

Natasha Oickle (Lived experience representative)

Originally from Canada, I am now a proud Queenslander with 20 years’ experience as an executive manager. I spent many years living and working in different countries, and this has enabled me to develop additional language skills as well as a big-picture approach to strategic planning. I have contributed to capacity building and policy development in several sectors including the education and not-for-profit sectors in Australia, Japan, Korea and the Philippines.

I have always been drawn to service providers that assist marginalised and vulnerable people and am passionate about helping others along their journeys. I am honoured to contribute to the important work of the Mental Health Commission. It is my hope that the Commission will embed a systemic approach to decreasing the incidence of poor mental health as well as increases community awareness and easier access for Queenslanders with lived experience.

Abi Cooper (Lived experience representative)

I’m from Yeppoon, a small town about eight hours north on Darumbal country, but I currently live in Brisbane. As a young person with lived experience I’ve been interacting with the mental health system on a personal basis since I was in my early teens, as both a young carer and someone who lives with mental-ill health. I’ve also been engaged with the system on a professional basis, and I currently work with Orygen on their National Youth Advisory Council. I am an advocate for more inclusive, holistic and intersectional mental health care that is led by young people, for young people. 

I chose to be a part of this committee because I believe it is incredibly important to listen to and represent the voices of young people in the mental health sector. We are such a key consumer and a really unique group, and any service or body that hopes to address mental health must also look at young people as a part of that. 

In this role, I really hope that I can be a good advocate and ally for young Queenslanders. I hope that I can use my own experiences to push for a more inclusive and safe system, and to empower other young people to take charge and make change. 

Tanya Kretschmann (QLD Consumer Representative, National Mental Health Consumer Carer Forum)

Bio to come.

https://qmhc.shorthandstories.com/meet-the-team/index.html?utm_campaign=COVID-19&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=91480951&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_gJ6CXReMTht9Ub7zwJouXjNXxt91BAqUcXIbGJkk8qlMzNEiohxqGvRg9XETbOTn489v_dIFSZf-IjdaJmQ8VeU93R0PbowbLcnOJQ7tyKG8xVw4&utm_content=91480951&utm_source=hs_email

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14 https://www.lifeline.org.au/

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

I acknowledge that the wealth of Australia today was created by robbing the Indigenous peoples of this country of their land, their lives, their health, their language, and their children.

The denial of this history continues to rob them of their dignity and their birthright. I support a treaty

Proposed QLD Mental Health Consumer Peak body

Queensland Mental Health Commission 4th February 2020

The voices of people with lived experience of mental illness will be heard at all levels of Queensland’s mental health system with the creation of a new consumer representative body.

Queensland Mental Health Alcohol and Other Drugs Branch Executive Director Associate Professor John Allan said Queensland Health and the Queensland Mental Health Commission (QMHC) were working together to bring the new organisation to life in 2021.

“We’re committed to giving voice to the people our mental health system is here to serve,” Associate Professor Allan said.

Queensland Mental Health Commissioner Mr Ivan Frkovic said people needed to have access to appropriate services to address their physical and mental health care needs.

“That means the views of people who use those services need to be considered and respected,” he said.

The new consumer mental health peak body will provide advice and advocacy that represents the interests of those involved in the mental health system and will inform ongoing reform of mental health in Queensland.

Mr Frkovic said its broad membership base would encompass and represent people living with a mental illness.

Associate Professor Allan said the new body was a result of a Health Consumers Queensland report commissioned by Queensland Health and developed through consultations involving people with lived experience of mental illness, their carers and families.

“The QMHC has agreed to be the auspicing agency for the mental health consumer representative peak organisation and will manage all aspects in the establishment of this organisation,” Associate Professor Allan said.

He said a QMHC project team would oversee establishment of the body.

Mr Frkovic said the organisation would be established in consultation with key stakeholders through a co-design approach.

The decision to establish the consumer mental health peak body aligns with:

• the Shifting minds: Queensland Mental Health, Alcohol and Other Drugs Strategic Plan 2018-2023
• Queensland Health’s Connecting Care to Recovery 2016–2021 plan for State-funded mental health, alcohol and other drug services, and
• the Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan, which notes that “consumers and carers should be at the centre of, and enabled to take an active role in shaping, the way in which services are planned, delivered and evaluated”.

Queensland Health’s Connecting Care to Recovery plan prioritises strengthening statewide, regional and local mechanisms for participation of individuals, families and carers in activities that contribute to the safety and improvement of mental health, alcohol and other drug service delivery.

Follow the progress of this work here.

Media:
Queensland Health – news@health.qld.gov.au or 07 3708 5376;
QMHC – Carolyn Varley, carolyn.varley@qmhc.qld.gov.au or 0477 385 121.

For help in Australia

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14 https://www.lifeline.org.au/

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 46 36

https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help helpline@sane.org

SANE Australia Helpline  Chat –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time) 1800 187 263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

I acknowledge that the wealth of Australia today was created by robbing the Indigenous peoples of this country of their land, their lives, their health, their language, and their children.

The denial of this history continues to rob them of their dignity and their birthright. I support a treaty.

The Rotterdam Statement – Zero Suicide

moving beyond the tipping point

Preface

On September 3 – 4, 2018, more than 100 leaders from nearly 20 countries convened at the Zero Suicide International 4 summit in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Here they designed the revision of the 2015 International Zero Suicide Declaration. The declaration you are about to read now clarifies the commitment of these leaders to improve healthcare suicide prevention as a complement to public health and community suicide prevention initiatives.

What is Zero Suicide Healthcare?

Rooted in universal human values and based on scientific evidence Zero Suicide Healthcare is a worldwide emergent transformative approach that aims for a shift of mindset in healthcare and society: from passive acceptance to active prevention. Its inspirational goal drives healthcare systems to continually improve the quality of care. Zero Suicide offers healthcare leaders clear strategies and principles to learn to protect ever more patients, relatives and staff against the tragedy of suicide.

For those who turn to healthcare Zero Suicide offers a better experience when feeling suicidal. They will experience that suicidality can be discussed openly, is treated directly and managed in a least restrictive, recovery-oriented way. As they transition through the system they have chosen, no person falls through the cracks. Zero Suicide Healthcare is not an isolated strategy. It is a complement to other community-based suicide prevention initiatives which will be running simultaneously.

Why is it important?

Because lives, many lives, are at stake. More than 800, 000 people die of suicide every year. Evidence shows that many more suicides are prevented in healthcare systems which provide better suicide prevention care. Radical system transformation can drive down suicide rates to zero. Knowing this, there is no time to lose. To make inroads we need systemic change.

Who is it for?

First, it is for healthcare leaders across the globe. They are the drivers of the Zero Suicide Healthcare model and within their system protectors of a safe and just culture of learning and improving. Second, it is for all staff working in healthcare. Working in a Zero Suicide organization they are well trained and supported to provide excellent suicide prevention care; and feel safe to find and repair root causes underlying adverse events. Last but not least, it is for all partners, for governments and politicians; media; industries and employers; public  health and suicide prevention organizations; persons with lived experience and scientists. With their force, expertise and willingness they partner together with healthcare systems to move the needle and drive down population suicide rates.

The Rotterdam Declaration

The Rotterdam Declaration is supported by healthcare leaders who attended the Summit. We urge all to join the growing international learning community and use this Declaration to find the tipping points in your healthcare system that will deliver the change you want to see. Bold visions have put a man on the moon and eradicated polio. There’s no more time for half measures. Only with insightful leadership committed to the pursuit of Zero Suicide, will we be able to make strides towards this important vision.

David W. Covington, LPC, MBA Dr. Jan Mokkenstorm
RI International, USA               113 Suicide Prevention, the Netherlands

                  

The Rotterdam Declaration    

Every minute of every day suicide impacts the lives of hundreds of people across the globe. It robs families of loved ones, young people of their future, workplaces of colleagues and communities of their most valuable resource – their people.

We, the participants at the fourth Zero Suicide International summit in Rotterdam September 2018, and representing a diverse group of healthcare leaders, academic institutions, civil society, the private sector, governments and persons with lived experience:

Accept: The World Health Organization Report: Preventing Suicide: a global imperative key message: Suicides are preventable. For national responses to be effective a comprehensive multi-sectoral suicide prevention strategy is needed and this should include making suicide prevention a core responsibility of health systems, with collaboration between health and non-health sectors at governmental and non-governmental levels.i

Acknowledge:  Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which says the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is a fundamental human right.ii

Recognise: The United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (3) which targets by 2030, a reduction by one third of premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being. Measured by the suicide mortality rate.iii

Understand: The devastating impact that suicides have on the health workforce, families, workplaces and communities.

The Zero Suicide Healthcare Framework

The model offers both a realistic and effective approach to eliminating suicides. Zero Suicide Healthcare is a systematic, leadership-driven, continuous quality improvement approach to reducing suicides in care. The framework equips institutions with training, access to evidence-based treatments and supports and care pathways that have demonstrated exceptional results in healthcare systems.

We commit to:

Leadership centred on a just, safety-driven culture informed by evidence and lived expertise

  • Health systems leaders create a culture founded on a relentless pursuit to prevent suicide. We believe a suicide event (attempt or death) is an avoidable outcome of care in a modern healthcare setting.
  • Recovery, healing, learning and improvement after losing a patient to suicide are integral to the culture of the healthcare system. Blame, punishment or retribution is unacceptable
  • Hospital and healthcare staff are compassionate, confident and competent as they identify and care for those with suicidal behaviour.

A teamwork approach when engaging those who are suicidal

  • For those who seek help through healthcare systems, their pain and distress is acknowledged in a timely, respectful and caring manner, free from discrimination
  • Person-centred, treatment-oriented screening and assessment for suicidality is practised, including direct enquiry regarding suicidal thoughts and behaviours
  • Interventions include direct treatment for suicidality in the least restrictive settings using collaborative, research-informed practice techniques including safety planning and caring contacts.
  • Care management is determined through productive patient/staff interactions
  • Decisions from one level of care (e.g., hospital care) are communicated in a timely way to other necessary levels of care (e.g., intensive outpatient, private therapist, pharmacological therapy).

Active participation of patients, health professionals and family members or carers in safety planning and transition to aftercare

  • Active involvement in safety planning, including means restriction, ahead of being discharged from care. This will include where possible active engagement and education for family members and loved ones
  • Shared service responsibilities and communication between clinical staff within the hospital and providers in the wider community
  • Active outreach from the hospital before the next  appointment
  • Peer support offered from within the hospital system and through community-based support services.

Data and implementation science deliver continuous improvement

  • Continuous quality improvement has its foundations in data collection and analysis and importantly, its application
  • Open access to data is available within the constraints of privacy legislation
  • Clinicians and teams use data to monitor ongoing performance, refine services and evaluate impact, always with a view to enabling improved outcomes
  • Learning is facilitated through expansion of new and ongoing implementation approaches across the world and a commitment to shared learning through publication of outcomes
  • New approaches are explored and supported through increased investment in research, particularly translational & implementation science research for real-world relevance.

Synergy in collaborative networks with general and public healthcare or community suicide prevention initiatives.

Conclusion

For healthcare systems: efficiency without quality is unthinkable. Quality without efficiency is unsustainable. The Zero Suicide Healthcare model represents quality and efficiency – it is the synthesis of ambition and science.

Zero Suicide Healthcare represents joined up care so that no person need die alone and in despair from suicide.

Need more information

ZeroSuicide.org for global learning community.

ZeroSuicide.com for fidelity toolkit & resources

  1. World Health Organization: Preventing Suicide: a global imperative. Page 9. Luxembourg 2014
  2. Universal Declaration of Human Rights; http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/
  3. United Nations Sustainable Development Goals https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdg3#targets
  4. Kruk M et al; The Lancet Global Health – High-quality health systems in the Sustainable Development Goals era: time for a revolution, The Lancet Vol 392, September 2018.

The Ozzies

#Lucinda Brogden, #Jacinta Hawgood, #Mathew Large, #Sue Murray, #Alan Woodward #Helena Christensen

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 pm – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10 am-10 pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10 am-10 pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

NSW begins journey towards zero suicides with $90,000,000

Media Release from the NSW Premier; 17th October 2018

Media Announcement

All people who have been admitted to hospital following an attempted suicide and those who have reached out for help will have access to follow up care and support under a new comprehensive strategy that marks the beginning of our journey towards zero suicides in NSW.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian and Minister for Mental Health Tanya Davies announced nearly $90 million for new suicide prevention initiatives during the launch of the state’s first comprehensive suicide prevention strategy.

“The tragic loss of life from suicide leaves families and communities devastated and we shouldn’t accept the current rates,” Ms Berejiklian said.

“Two to three people lose their lives to suicide in NSW each day, and this has to stop.

“Today’s announcement provides vital funding and better coordination between the various support providers and agencies to ensure no-one slips through the cracks.

“This investment in mental health is possible because of our strong economic management.”

The number of lives lost to suicide in NSW – 880 in 2017 – is more than double the State’s road toll and the leading cause of death for people aged 15 to 44 years.

Mrs Davies said communities at high risk of suicide will benefit from new or expanded initiatives from next year including:

  • Aftercare services – ensuring all people who have been admitted to hospital following a suicide attempt have access to follow up care and support
  • Emergency Department alternatives – provide a more suitable alternative for people in crisis, such as designated ‘cafes’ with trained mental health workers at hand
  • Zero Suicides in Care – strengthening practices within the mental health system to eliminate suicide attempts by people in care
  • Expand community mental health outreach teams – to increase capacity to respond to calls to the NSW Mental Health hotline
  • New support services for people bereaved by suicide – to prevent ‘clusters’ of further suicides, especially among young people.
  • Resilience building within local communities – engage communities to participate in suicide prevention, with particular focus on Aboriginal communities
  • Enhance the Rural Adversity Mental Health Program – to provide additional counsellors for people in regional and rural areas
  • Improved collection and distribution of suicide data in NSW

“We expect these initiatives to have the biggest impact on suicide in NSW the State has ever seen and will ensure that we reduce the number of lives lost to suicide in NSW,” Mrs Davies said.

“Evidence shows integrated, community-led activities are more effective in suicide prevention than standalone, isolated activities that are not well linked.

“This is about providing our communities with the most effective tools so they have the strength, resilience and capacity to prevent and respond to suicide.”

The strategy known as the Strategic Framework for Suicide Prevention in NSW 2018-2023(external link) was developed by the Mental Health Commission of NSW and the NSW Ministry of Health, in collaboration with people with lived experience of a suicide attempt or suicide bereavement, government agencies, mental health organisations and experts in suicide prevention.

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10am-10pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10am-10pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

 

tree

 

ALASKA: Public Health Releases Five-Year Suicide Prevention Plan

Alaska suicide prevention plan

Table of Contents
Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………….7
The Parable of the River……………………………………………………………………………9

Goal 1: Alaskans Accept Responsibility for Preventing Suicide

Strategy 1.1 ~ Alaskans learn and understand that suicide is preventable……..10
Strategy 1.2 ~ Respected Alaska adults and elders practice healthy,
responsible lifestyles in order to serve as role models for younger
generations…………………………………………………………………………………………..11
Strategy 1.3 ~ Alaska youth are connected to healthy relationships with
respected role models in their community………………………………………………….12
Strategy 1.4 ~ Communities will cultivate environments of respectfulness
and connectedness for all Alaskans…………………………………………………………..13
Strategy 1.5 ~ Communities will engage parents and other respected adults
in the promotion of healthy lifestyles with youth………………………………………….14
Strategy 1.6 ~ Communities will host conversations and share information
about suicide prevention…………………………………………………………………………15
Strategy 1.7 ~ Community organizations will support and promote
healthy families and lifestyles………………………………………………………………….16
Strategy 1.8 ~ The State of Alaska will enhance peer-to-peer supports
as an integral part of wellness promotion and suicide prevention…………………17

Goal 2: Alaskans Prevent and Mitigate the Impact of Trauma, Substance Abuse, and Other Risk Factors Contributing to Suicide

Strategy 2.1 ~ Alaskans know how to identify when someone is at risk of
suicide, and how to respond appropriately to prevent a suicide……………………..18
Strategy 2.2 ~ Alaskans know about Careline and other community
crisis lines, and can share that information with others……………………………….20
Strategy 2.3 ~ Providers of services to veterans and family caregivers
will prioritize suicide prevention screenings and effective interventions…………20
Strategy 2.4 ~ Spiritual leaders will encourage suicide prevention
awareness and training in their communities of faith/belief………………………….21
Strategy 2.5 ~ Alaskans come together in reconciliation and healing
to restore what was lost due to historical trauma and colonization………………..22
Strategy 2.6 ~ Health care providers understand how to recognize the
signs of suicide risk, talk with/screen patients about suicide, and
connect patients to appropriate treatment and support services……………………23       Strategy 2.7 ~ All Alaskans, senior services providers, and family caregivers understand how to recognize and act on the signs of suicide risk and other factors for suicide (substance abuse, violence, depression, etc.),  to protect the health of seniors.24      Strategy 2.8 ~ The State of Alaska will expand evidence-based crisis intervention training and supports to the entire public safety system (law enforcement, village police/public safety officers, EMTs, firefighters, etc.)……………………………………………………………………25

Goal 3: Alaskans Communicate, Cooperate, and Coordinate Suicide Prevention Efforts

Strategy 3.1 ~ Communities will partner with diverse organizations
to raise awareness about limiting access to lethal means of suicide…………….26
Strategy 3.2 ~ The State of Alaska and its partners will make training
in evidence-based suicide prevention and intervention models accessible
to all interested Alaskans……………………………………………………………………….27
Strategy 3.3 ~ Communities will include suicide prevention in their wellness
coalitions’ missions……………………………………………………………………………….28
Strategy 3.4 ~ Community suicide prevention efforts will expressly address the contributing factor of substance abuse……………………………………29
Strategy 3.5 ~ The State of Alaska will coordinate all prevention
efforts across all departments and divisions, to ensure that Alaska has
a comprehensive prevention system that recognizes the connections
between suicide, substance abuse, domestic violence, bullying,
child abuse, teen risk behaviors, poor school performance, etc……………………30
Strategy 3.6 ~ The State of Alaska will provide financial and technical
support for innovative implementation of 1) evidenced-based prevention
and 2) research-based suicide prevention practices that provide a sense
of hope and opportunity. ………………………………………………………………………..
Strategy 3.7 ~ The State of Alaska will support positive messaging,
community conversations and media efforts to change social norms and
perceptions about mental illness, addiction, depression, and suicide,
and promote seeking treatment and recovery…………………………………………….32

Goal 4: Alaskans Have Immediate Access to the Prevention, Treatment, and Recovery Services They Need

Strategy 4.1 ~ Alaskans know who to call and how to access help — and
then ask for that help — when they feel like they are in crisis and/or at
risk of suicide…………………………………………………………………………….33
Strategy 4.2 ~ Community health providers offer appropriate services
to Alaskans in crisis when they need them and as close to home
as possible………………………………………………………………………………………….. 34
Strategy 4.3~ Community health providers will offer bridge services
for young adults experiencing serious behavioral health disorders after
age 18/21…………………………………………………………………………………………….34

Goal 5: Alaskans Support Survivors in Healing

Strategy 5.1 ~ Survivors of a loss to suicide know about ongoing support and suicide prevention resources and how to share their lived experience in suicide prevention efforts that support their own healing. 35

Strategy 5.2 ~ The State of Alaska will provide resources, tools, and technical assistance for locally-directed postvention efforts when invited by communities…………………………………………………………………………..35

Goal 6: Quality Data and Research is Available and Used for Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation of Suicide Prevention Efforts

Strategy 6.1~ The State of Alaska will improve statewide suicide
data collection efforts, employing epidemiological standards/models
to ensure quality reporting, analysis, and utilization for timely
data-driven policy decisions……………………………………………………………………36
Strategy 6.2 ~ The State of Alaska will partner with tribal governments,
Alaska Native corporations, and academic organizations to continue to
explore and research the multiple dimensions of risk factors for suicide,
prioritizing the health and environmental factors affecting high-risk
populations…………………………………………………………………………………………37
Strategy 6.3~ The State of Alaska, with its partners, will evaluate
the effectiveness of crisis intervention models and responses in
use in Alaska………………………………………………………………………………………..39

Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………41

Recasting the Net Upstream Checklist………………42

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10am-10pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10am-10pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

The Centre for Rural & Remote Mental Health (CRRMH)

Position Paper recommends strategies to save lives and decrease rates of rural suicide

Rural & TRmote Suicide Prevention Plan 2018

Rural Suicide appears to be getting worse rather than better. In 2016 the number of suicides per 100,000 people in rural and remote Australia was 50 per cent higher than in capital cities.

This has prompted the Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health (CRRMH) to develop a Position Paper on “Rural Suicide and its Prevention”. This paper proposes five key focus areas for action to address the need to save rural lives now and to lower the number of deaths and rates of suicide in the future.

Director of the CRRMH, Professor David Perkins said that recommendations outlined in the Position Paper draw on the suggestions and ideas obtained from participants who attended the CRRMH’s Rural Suicide Prevention Forum held at the Sydney Royal Easter Show as well as local and international sources, and the CRRMH’s experience and research.

“Rural suicide causes enormous distress to individuals, families, schools, workplaces, and communities and must be addressed seriously. We believe that the higher rates of suicide in rural and remote Australia and the current upward trend in rural suicide rates are not acceptable,” he said.

“Clearly the way we currently think about and respond to the problem of suicide prevention is not working in regional, rural and remote Australia. While the evidence to inform the prevention of suicide in rural areas is not perfect, this should not prevent us from taking action,” said Professor Perkins.

Patron of the CRRMH, His Excellency General The Honourable David Hurley AC DSC (Ret’d) Governor of NSW has endorsed the Position Paper and says the purpose of this paper is twofold: to describe the problem and to suggest how we might address it based on the best available evidence.

You can watch his introduction here.

The paper outlines two focus areas for immediate action that include strategies to: prevent people who experience suicidality from taking their own lives and to help those who are affected by the suicide of others.

The other three focus areas include suggestions designed to: prevent deaths in the future including providing support to vulnerable groups in rural and remote populations, building protective factors in children and young people and; building healthy and resilient people and communities.

The paper also provides concrete suggestions for addressing the high rates of suicide in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities specifically looking at indigenous leadership and participation in suicide prevention strategies.

Strategies outlined advocate that leadership for rural suicide prevention is needed at the Commonwealth, State and Local Government level. Local communities also have a role to play and are best-placed to identify local opportunities for suicide prevention, both in terms of how to help those who might be at risk of experiencing suicidality and how to improve the resilience of their community.

“Decreasing the suicide rates is not just the responsibility of the health sector; it goes beyond health,” said Professor Perkins.

“It can’t be one size fits all approach; these strategies must consider the unique social, economic and environmental strengths and weaknesses that exist in individual rural communities.

“Everyone needs to be part of the solution to the under-recognised and unacceptable problem of rural suicide.”

The CRRMH welcomes the opportunity to partner with organisations that wish to take action and have a positive impact on rural suicide.

To assess the Position Paper

Download the Position Paper here: Rural Suicide and its Prevention: a CRRMH position paper (5 MB)

Summary – Position Paper

Download the our Summary Document here: Summary – Rural Suicide and its Prevention: a CRRMH Prevention Paper (254 KB)

Contact us

Please email us crrmh@newcastle.edu.au or call 02 6363 8444.

Help services

If you or someone else is in immediate danger, call 000 or go to your nearest hospital emergency department.

If you’re concerned about your own or someone else’s mental health, you can call the NSW Mental Health Line 1800 011 511 for advice.

Having a tough time and need someone to talk to right now? The following services are here to help. They are confidential and available 24/7.

The LifeSpan Sites – Black Dog Institute

A comprehensive research trial of LifeSpan is being undertaken in 4 sites in NSW while implementation support is being provided by the LifeSpan team to sites across Australia.

LifeSpan NSW research trial

Funded by the Paul Ramsay Foundation and with the support of the NSW Government and the NSW Mental Health Commission, LifeSpan is being delivered and comprehensively evaluated in four NSW sites. This follows a rigorous selection process that was undertaken to select sites on the basis of need, community and stakeholder readiness, and capacity.

LifeSpan will be implemented using a staged roll out with each of the four sites supported to implement LifeSpan over a 2.5 year period.

  1. Newcastle: Hunter New England LHD in partnership with Hunter New England Central Coast Primary Health Network, Hunter Primary Care, Calvary Ltd and Everymind.
  2. Illawarra Shoalhaven: Coordinare – the South East NSW Primary Health Network
  3. Central Coast: Central Coast LHD
  4. Murrumbidgee: Murrumbidgee Primary Health Network

Supporting Commonwealth suicide prevention trial sites

The Black Dog Institute is funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health to provide support to the 12 Primary Health Networks selected as trial sites for the National Suicide Prevention Trials.

The 12 sites receiving support from the LifeSpan team are:

State/Territory Trial sites
Queensland 1. Townsville
2. Wide Bay, Sunshine Coast and Central Queensland
3. Brisbane North
Northern Territory 4. Darwin
Western Australia 5. Mid West, Country Western Australia
6. Perth South
7. Kimberley, Western Australia
New South Wales 8. North Coast
9. Western NSW
Victoria 10. North Western Melbourne
Tasmania 11. Tasmania
South Australia 12. Country South Australia

 

Lifespan sites page

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Improving emergency and follow-up care for suicidal crisis – a Lifespan strategy

ED services

What we know?

A suicide attempt is the strongest risk factor for subsequent suicide. To reduce the risk of future attempts, a coordinated approach to care for people after a suicide attempt is essential.

Coordination of care is complex and emergency departments are high-pressure environments where staff are time poor.

Often people who present in emergency departments (EDs) for suicidal thinking or attempts don’t receive the care and support they need.

Evidence shows that it is the experience rather than strict adherence to a protocol that makes the difference between good and poor care. When people seek help, services need to make them feel validated, welcome and heard.

What is happening?

  • Improved crisis care with new guidelines and training in EDs, education and resource packs distributed to individuals and families in crisis.
  • Dedicated aftercare services for people who attempt suicide.
  • Better networks and information sharing between care providers and families.

Strategy Summary – Emergency and follow-up care

This brochure provides community members with a summary of the evidence, what is happening and how you can get involved.

Download the brochure

Research Summary – Emergency and follow-up care 

This document provides a detailed summary of the evidence covering why the strategy is included in LifeSpan, evidence supporting the interventions recommended by LifeSpan, and how this strategy will be evaluated as part of the LifeSpan NSW Research trial.

Download the research summary

Guidelines for integrated suicide-related crisis and follow-up care in Emergency Departments and other acute settings

Recommended strategies and an accompanying Clinical Summary, produced by Black Dog in collaboration with leading clinicians and those with a lived experience of suicide attempt.

Download the PDF (3031 KB)

To find out how you can support this initiative and help make a difference, please visit www.lifespan.org.au

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace      Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia Helpline 1800 18 7263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

LifeSpan strategies and components CRESP & Black Dog Institute

Lifespan is being trialed in 4 sites in NSW and 12 sites around Australia

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Lifespan summary document

About lifespan

LifeSpan involves the implementation of nine evidence-based strategies simultaneously within a localised area. This integrated systems approach is predicted to prevent 21% of suicide deaths, and 30% of suicide attempts.

The nine LifeSpan strategies

LifeSpan involves the implementation of nine evidence-based strategies from population level to the individual, implemented simultaneously within a localised region. For successful delivery, all strategies require a thorough consultation and review process to ensure their relevance and tailoring to the local context and community.

Multiple strategies = more lives saved

Recognising that multiple strategies implemented at the same time are likely to generate bigger effects than just the sum of its parts (i.e., due to synergistic effects). LifeSpan offers a data driven, evidence-based approach, setting it apart from current practice and raising the bar in suicide prevention.

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For help in Australia

Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Suicide Callback Service     1300 659 467

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace      Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline 1300 78 99 78

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527         Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

Warwickshire Suicide Prevention Strategy. 2016-20

A local government suicide prevention strategy in England

Warwickshire Suicide Prevention Strategy 2016-20

Our challenge

105 people died by suicide, confirmed by Coroner’s conclusions, in Warwickshire in 2013 and 2014. 51 people were killed in road accidents in Warwickshire in the same time period.

Suicide and injury/poisoning of undetermined intent was the leading cause of death for males in three age groups (5-19, 20-34, and 35-49 years) – above road accidents – in England and Wales in 2014.

Each of these deaths could potentially have been prevented.

Priority 1: Reducing the risk of suicide in key high risk groups

Priority 2: Tailor approaches to improve mental health in specific groups

Priority 3: Reduce access to the means of suicide

Priority 4: Reducing the impact of suicide

Priority 5: Supporting the media in delivering sensitive approaches to suicide and    suicidal behaviour

Priority 6: Improving data and evidence

Priority 7: Working together

The population group with the highest suicide rate in England and Warwickshire is middle aged men. Sometimes this is seen as a reluctance to ask for help but other factors may be higher rates of risk factors such as alcohol misuse, economic pressures unemployment/redundancy and debt. We need to reduce stigma around suicidal thinking and seeking help, encourage help seeking, and ensure that services are responsive and offer appropriate support. We will use evidence such as that produced in the Mens Health Forum document “How to make mental health services work for men and others to ensure services meet the needs of those most at risk.

For help in Australia

Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Suicide Callback Service     1300 659 467

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace      Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline 1300 78 99 78

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527         Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

 

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