Why Peer Support Matters in Suicide Prevention with Eduardo Vega 02/13 by Hope Illuminated | Self Help Podcasts

Eduardo Vega begins by sharing his own experiences with suicidal intensity and the ?incomprehensible demoralization? he felt as he tried to escape himself. For him, the turning point happened when he started to connect with something larger than himself by helping others. Eduardo talks at length on the podcast about the helper principle – in other words, the notion that helping others helps us. While the idea of peer support has long been promoted in addiction recovery and among mental health advocates, it is just now gaining traction in suicide prevention. More information and show notes here: https://www.sallyspencerthomas.com/hope-illuminated-podcast/9

Source: Why Peer Support Matters in Suicide Prevention with Eduardo Vega 02/13 by Hope Illuminated | Self Help Podcasts

Advertisements

Assessing and managing suicidal patients in the emergency department

Emergency Psychiatry

Christopher James Ryan, Matthew Large, Robert Gribble, Matthew Macfarlane, Ralf Ilchef, Tad Tietze

Abstract
Objective: The objective of this article is to set out consensus guidelines for the assessment and management of “suicidal patients” in the emergency department.
Conclusions: Clinicians should be respectful and reassuring. They should review old notes, conduct a full history and examination, and talk to friends, family and any practitioners already involved in the patient’s care. Management should be guided, where possible, by the patient’s preferences, not by notions of risk. Every negotiated management plan and its rationale should be carefully documented.

Many people who present to the emergency department raise concerns in clinicians about the possibility of suicide. This may be because they have expressed suicidal ideation or have attempted suicide, or because they exhibit severe depression, an angry and unstable mood, intoxication or psychosis. In writing this paper, six psychiatrists who between us have decades of experience working in six large emergency departments in
and around Sydney came together to offer practical advice to clinicians working with these patients. For want of a better term, we will refer to them as “suicidal patients”. A number of documents with the same aim appear in the academic literature1–3 or as part of government policy. 4–8 In our view, though, no published guideline takes sufficient account of the recovery movement, of recent reforms to mental health legislation, or of the lack of utility of suicide risk assessment.9,10

Principles of assessment and
management of suicidal patients

Suicidal patients are an extremely heterogeneous group and consequently their assessment and management will vary enormously. However, all suicidal patients will
experience one or more stressors that threaten to overwhelm their available resources, and in all cases three principles should guide the clinician.
1. Almost all suicidal patients will benefit from feeling listened to and understood.           2. Most of the stressors suicidal patients experience ease with intervention and/or time.
3. People who can make decisions for themselves should be allowed to.

Table 1. Useful questions

I have seen some paperwork, but I wonder if you could let me know what happened? While you were taking the tablets, what was going through your mind?
Did you think you had any other options? What did you think was going to happen?
How long have you been thinking about this for?
If you could change a couple of things in your life, what would they be? How are you feeling now?
What has changed that means you are no longer feeling suicidal? How are you coping in the ED?
Who is important to you? Do they know what has happened? Are you thinking you need to be in hospital?
If you went home now, do you think you’d be OK?
Do you have any plans as to how to address the issues that led you to feel suicidal? How can we help?
.

Assessing and managing suicidal patients   link to PDF

Australasian Psychiatry
2015, Vol 23(5) 513–516
© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015
Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav

DOI: 10.1177/1039856215597536
apy.sagepub.com

545d744ce4f4b7c4545ce2ded348d31a.jpg

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10am-10pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10am-10pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

 

Shifting the Dial – new settings, new players in suicide prevention

8th May 2018, The J Noosa QLD, Cost $250

United Synergies & ConNetica

Description

Shifting the Dial on suicide prevention: new settings, new players will showcase new understandings, new approaches and challenge current paradigms in suicide and self harm prevention.

Key Speakers

  • Dr Sally Spencer Thomas – World renowned suicidologist
  • Professor Chris Sarra – 2016 NAIDOC Person of the Year and leading Indigenous Educator
  • Professor Rob Donovan – Creator of the Mentally Healthy Campaign WA, Denmark and Norway
  • Ivan Frkovic -Queensland Mental Health Commissioner
  • Brendan Maher – R U OK? CEO
  • Dr Victoria Ross – Australian Institute for Suicide Research and Prevention (AISRAP), Griffith University
  • Matthew Tukaki – Chair, Suicide Prevention Australia

May 8th 2018 8.30am – 5.00pm The J, Noosa Drive, Noosa Heads Qld 4567

Concessional tickets ($50) are available by contacting Bronya Marks at United Synergies on bmarks@unitedsynergies.com.au or phone 07 5442 4277 during business hours.

United Synergies Ltd, Australia’s leading service provider in support to those bereaved by suicide and ConNetica Consulting Ltd, a national consultancy on Mental Health and Suicide Prevention are teaming up to bring a forum together on the important issue of suicide and self-harm.

Many local industries and workplaces are being identified as places where we can coordinate efforts to address the important issue of suicide and self harm. Pharmacies, Councils, real estate agents, first responders, schools and workplaces can each be important points of contact for those experiencing suicidal thoughts or self harming behaviours.

This forum will explore and present some of the innovative ways activities can be used to support those experiencing or impacted by exposure to suicidal behaviours. With international, national and state experienced speakers, we encourage you to come along.

United Synergies http://www.unitedsynergies.com.au/

ConNetica Consulting https://www.connetica.com.au/

db081f5b549aa49dcfd72a6717faa859.jpg

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10am-10pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10am-10pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Technology and Suicide Risk: Moving Beyond Fear to Opportunity

Author:  Elly Stout, MS, SPRC Director, Education Development Center 2.3.2018

Communication has changed in the 10 years since I started at SPRC, especially in our virtual lives. On my ride to work on the commuter rail these days, most of the passengers are texting, checking news updates on tablets, and working on laptops, when just a few years ago we might have been reading books or newspapers. As social media and smart devices have become dramatically more central in our lives, I’ve heard concerns about how these changes might affect suicide risk, especially among youth. But instead of approaching these changes with fear, I would encourage the suicide prevention field to embrace them as new opportunities for promoting dialogue, fostering supportive connections, and spreading messages of hope.

I’ve seen the unease around youth cyber safety in my own social media feeds and online news platforms, but let’s pause to consider what the research tells us. The fact is, the science is inconclusive on the impact of social media use on mental health and suicide risk. Some research points to potential harm from certain kinds of online interactions for some youth.1,2,3 But other studies show potentially positive benefits, including providing a safe space to seek support for suicide-related feelings.2,3,4 While cyberbullying is a related, rising concern, in-person bullying remains much more common.5 Moreover, just as positive school climate initiatives have taught students to step in or go to an adult when they see bullying in person, young people can learn to be good “digital citizens” by standing up against inappropriate online behaviors and taking measures to protect their privacy. ConnectSafely has helpful resources to help parents and educators teach kids about technology safety, privacy, and security.

Social media and technology can offer ways to connect authentically with others, especially for young people. Virtual connections can be a lifeline for someone who is feeling isolated in their physical community, allowing individuals to find people online who share similar experiences and can offer empathy and support. Social media is also a great way to reach a lot of people very quickly, and can serve as a powerful vehicle for spreading messages of hope, support, and recovery. It allows parents and other concerned adults to witness conversations we may not otherwise have known about, and to intervene with resources or other supports when we see someone in crisis. Social media platforms themselves have also been thinking about how to leverage technological tools to help those in crisis. For instance, Facebook has been working with suicide prevention experts for several years to help make crisis services and other resources available to users.

While the research is still playing out on the pros and cons of new technology, there are things we can do today to promote potential benefits and minimize possible risks. In our suicide prevention programs and our personal lives, we can encourage kids to connect in healthy ways, and make sure they know how to reach out for support when they’re concerned about someone’s online posts. We can offer alternative options to screen time that encourage face-to-face connections and physical activity. If young people are having conversations online that concern us, we can take the opportunity to talk with them about how they are feeling, offer support, and help them reach out to peers who may be struggling. SPRC offers resources that can help, including an information sheet for teens that lists call, text, chat, and email options for finding support, as well as guidance for using technology and social media for prevention efforts.

I hope we won’t let our concerns about potential risks overshadow the opportunities social media and smart devices offer to stay connected, reach out, and support each other. Since technology and social media are here to stay, let’s use them for good, building on the positive opportunities to increase social support and connectedness, while at the same time finding opportunities for in-person connections in our families, communities, and prevention initiatives.

References

  1. Twenge, J. M., Joiner, T. E., Rogers, M. L., & Martin, G. N. (2017). Increases in depressive symptoms, suicide-related outcomes, and suicide rates among U.S. adolescents after 2010 and links to increased new media screen time. Clinical Psychological Science, 6(1), 3–17.
  2. Marchant, A., Hawton, K., Stewart, A., Montgomery, P., Singaravelu, V., Lloyd, K., . . . John, A. (2017). A systematic review of the relationship between internet use, self-harm and suicidal behaviour in young people: The good, the bad and the unknown. PLoS ONE, 12(8). Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0181722
  3. Berryman, C., Ferguson, C. J., & Negy, C. (2017). Social media use and mental health among young adults. Psychiatric Quarterly. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1007/s11126-017-9535-6
  4. Oh, H. J., Ozkaya, E., & Larose, R. (2014). How does online social networking enhance life satisfaction? The relationships among online supportive interaction, affect, perceived social support, sense of community, and life satisfaction. Computers in Human Behavior, 30, 69–78.
  5. National Center for Education Statistics and Bureau of Justice Statistics. (2011). Student reports of bullying and cyber-bullying: Results from the 2011 school crime supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey. Retrieved from https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2013/2013329.pdf
Populations:  Youth
Planning and Implementing:  New and Social Media

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10am-10pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10am-10pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Wesley LifeForce Brisbane Memorial Service, 19th of April 2018

12:00pm at King George Square, BrisbaneBrisbane Memorial Service Invite- 19th of April

 

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10am-10pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10am-10pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Preventing Suicide in Primary Care: A Newly Updated Toolkit

Suicide Prevention Resource Centre (USA)

SPRC

February 09, 2018
News Type:  Director’s Corner

Elizabeth Tupa, PhD; Adam Chu, MPH

Primary care is a key setting for suicide prevention. Research has shown that individuals who die by suicide are more likely to have seen a primary care provider (PCP) than a mental health care professional shortly before their death.1,2 People often feel more comfortable accessing mental health care in primary care settings, so PCPs may have more frequent contact with individuals at risk for suicide,3,4 presenting more opportunities for intervention. This is especially important for middle-aged and older men, who are vulnerable to suicide risk and less likely to seek mental health care.5 In rural areas, PCPs have an even more critical role in suicide prevention as they may be the only health care provider accessible to those at risk. However, PCPs may not have the training or resources to treat patients at risk, so providing them with the relevant information and support is critical.

How can primary care practices take action to prevent suicide among their patients? The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education Mental Health Program (WICHE MHP) and SPRC have collaborated to bring primary care staff a comprehensive yet easy-to-use resource to help answer that question. The Suicide Prevention Toolkit for Primary Care Practices provides information, resources, and tools to support primary care practices in their suicide prevention efforts. First developed in 2009, the toolkit has been updated to align with Zero Suicide, a nationally recognized framework for providing safer and more comprehensive suicide care in health and behavioral health care settings. The updated toolkit contains the following:

  • A quick start guide that walks PCPs and office staff through the step-by-step development of a comprehensive yet streamlined strategy to help save patient lives.
  • An implementation checklist to help ensure that efforts are organized and thorough.
  • A primer that contains up-to-date facts and figures on suicide in the U.S., along with straightforward clinical information and guidance on suicide screening, assessment, safety planning, and hospitalization.
  • Patient management tools, including pocket-sized cards and templates to facilitate patient assessment and intervention.
  • A section on state resources, policy, and reimbursement that provides tips on how to maximize reimbursement for mental health and suicide-related services. It also includes information on integrating primary and behavioral health care, and how available Medicaid reimbursements can help facilitate that process.
  • New content on health care provider self-care and physician suicide.
  • Patient education tools and other resources, including suicide prevention awareness materials and websites that coach families in making their homes suicide safe.

Whether a primary care practice is treating an adolescent struggling with a crisis, a veteran suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, a middle-aged worker with depression and alcohol dependence, or a lonely older adult, this toolkit provides the information and resources needed to prevent suicide. The toolkit is designed to stand on its own, but orientation and training are also available for those who wish to take advantage of it. One survey found that PCPs who completed a toolkit training were more likely to agree that they had sufficient skills to assist suicidal patients, compared to before the training. Participants were also more likely to feel comfortable discussing suicide with their patients, and more likely to agree that implementing a suicide prevention program in their practice would help reduce suicide in their community. Toolkit hard copies, pocket guides, orientation, and training are available by contacting WICHE MHP at 303-541-0311 or mentalhealthmail@wiche.edu.

WICHE MHP and SPRC are excited to launch this updated toolkit. To effectively prevent suicide, we must meet individuals “where they are” in the health care system, and that means addressing suicide risk in primary care. We hope that this resource will help guide primary care practices in developing suicide prevention strategies and provide resources and support to PCPs caring for and treating at-risk patients.

Elizabeth Tupa is director of education and research in the Mental Health Program at the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education.

Adam Chu is senior project associate in SPRC’s Health and Behavioral Health Initiatives at Education Development Center.

References

  1. Ahmedani, B. K., Simon, G. E., Stewart, C., Beck, A., Waitzfelder, B. E., Rossom, R., . . . Solberg, L. I. (2014). Health care contacts in the year before suicide death. Journal of General Internal Medicine29(6), 870–877.
  2. Luoma, J. B., Martin, C. E., & Pearson, J. L. (2002). Contact with mental health and primary care providers before suicide: A review of the evidence. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 159(6), 909–916.
  3. Alang, S. M. (2015). Sociodemographic disparities associated with perceived causes of unmet need for mental health care. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 38(4), 293–299.
  4. Corrigan, P. W. (2004). How stigma interferes with mental health care. American Psychologist, 59, 614–625.
  5. Suicide Prevention Resource Center. (2016). Preventing suicide among men in the middle years: Recommendations for suicide prevention programs. Waltham, MA: Education Development Center.
Settings:  Health Care, Primary Care
Strategies:  Identify and Assist, Screening and Assessment, Effective Care/Treatment, Treatment, Safety Planning, Health Systems Change

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10am-10pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10am-10pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Suicide Prevention Services of America

Suicide Prevention Services of America

Suicide america

 

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace     Register and chat now at eheadspace, or call 1800 650 890  Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10am-10pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10am-10pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families