Will you give the gift of hope this Christmas?

Lifeline

Lifeline donate

“I was so relieved when I spoke to the person at Lifeline I can’t express it…they offered me hope.” – Trent

This Christmas you can give the gift hope to someone like Trent.

Dear Kerri,

In the moments before Trent called Lifeline, he was scared. He didn’t really want to die. He was afraid to hurt himself.

Trent was desperate. He thought that taking his own life was the only option.

This Christmas someone – perhaps someone you know or love – will feel the same way. Today you can be there for them.

Five years ago, Trent was a fit healthy 19-year old. He was a keen footy player who captained his local team when he headed off for weekend away with his mates expecting to have the best weekend:

“Little did I know that it was going to be one of the worst.”

In a freak accident, a soccer cross bar collpased on him, crushing Trent’s skull. His family were told the worst – but against all the odds Trent showed remarkable determination and survived.

The road to recovery was tough. Trent had to learn to walk, talk and do the most basic of tasks again. Every step of the way his friends and family were by his side.

There were many challenges and a few bumps along the way, but up until a few months ago everything was running along smoothly. It was then that Trent and his fiancé separated.

Trent was absolutely devastated but as a young man he thought he just needed to get over it. He told his friends and family that he was OK. But the reality was, he wasn’t:

“I lied to everyone. I said that I was doing well, and I dug myself so deep that I felt like I couldn’t go and then say I’m really struggling. So instead I told my family and friends I was in a good place.”

Thoughts of suicide began to crowd Trent’s brain:

“I was scared to die. I really didn’t want to die. I was afraid to hurt myself.”

At that moment when nothing but darkness and confusion filled Trent’s mind, he made a call to Lifeline.

That call changed his life:

“It was everything. It was non-prejudice, it was understanding. It was not pretending that you knew the answers. The guy on the phone listened and acknowledged everything that I felt … When I got off the phone, I felt an almighty sense of relief and calm come over my body.

He offered me hope.

This Christmas, someone in deep distress – just like Trent – will call Lifeline on 13 11 14. That is why our need for your support is urgent, as sometimes the only thing that will keep them safe is that they picked up that phone.

That’s why I hope you will give from your heart this Christmas season. Your generous spirit and commitment will provide hope and healing to a fellow Australian.

Everyone deserves hope this Christmas. 

Donate today

Warm Regards,

Jessica Wood

Individual Giving Manager

Lifeline Australia

For 24/7 crisis support and suicide prevention services call 13 11 14 or visit www.lifeline.org.au/gethelp

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Understanding Survivors of Suicide Loss

Suicide is a death like no other…

Deborah Serani Psy.D.

Dr. Deborah Serani is the award-winning author of “Living with Depression,”  “Depression and Your Child: A Guide for Parents and Caregivers” and “Depression in Later Life” by the Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group. Dr. Serani is a licensed psychologist in practice for over twenty five years. She is an adjunct professor at Adelphi University and a TEDx speaker.

Understanding suicide loss

survivors of suicide loss

Grief is a universal experience all human beings encounter. Though death inevitably touches our lives, research shows that many people grieve in varying and different ways. From the textures of emotions, to length of time in mourning, to even the kinds of rituals and remembrances that help heal the irreplaceable loss. Grieving the death of a loved one is never, ever easy.

Suicide, however, has been described as a death like no other … and it truly is. Death by suicide stuns with soul-crushing surprise, leaving family and friends not only grieving the unexpected death, but confused and lost by this haunting loss.

Who is a Survivor of Suicide Loss?

Despite science supporting a neurobiological basis for mental illness, suicide is still shrouded by stigma. Much of the general public believes that death by suicide is shameful and sinful. Others consider it a “choice that was made” and blame family members for its outcome. And then there are people who are unsure how to reach out and support those who have lost a loved one to suicide, and simply avoid the situation out of ignorance. Whatever the reason, it is important to note that the underlying structure of grief for survivors of suicide loss is intricately complicated.

When someone dies by suicide, research shows that at least 6 people are intimately traumatized by the death. Those who are directly affected include immediate family members, relatives, neighbors, friends, fellow students and/or co-workers. And because 90% of people who die by suicide have a psychological disorder, mental health clinicians are also included as a survivor of suicide loss.

From the nearly 800,000 suicides reported from 1986 through 2010 and using the 6 survivors per suicide estimate, it is believed that the number of survivors of suicide loss in the U.S. reaches 5 million people.

Understanding Suicide

Based on the accounts of those who have attempted suicide and lived to tell about it, we know that the primary goal of a suicide is not to end life, but to end pain. People in the grips of a suicidal depression are battling an emotional agony where living becomes objectionable. Most people who die by suicide have a significant depression narrowing their problem solving skills. Corrosive thinking reduces optimism, the hope of possibility and increases feelings of helplessness. The depressive illness itself makes it virtually impossible to hold onto any semblance of pain going away. While some may argue that a person who dies by suicide has done so by their own choice, I argue that serious mental illness, in fact, limits choice. Studies of those who have survived their suicide attempt and healed from their depression report being astonished that they ever considered suicide.

Why Grieving is Different

Research has long known that suicide survivors move through very distinctive bereavement issues. Family and friends are prone to feeling significant bewilderment about the suicide. Why did this happen? How did I not see this coming? Overwhelming guilt about what they should have done more of or less of —become daily, haunting thoughts. Survivors of suicide loss often feel self-blame as if somehow they were responsible for their loved one’s suicide. Many also experience anger and rage against their loved one for abandoning or rejecting them—or disappointment that somehow they were not powerful enough, loved enough or special enough to prevent the suicide.

These mistaken assumptions plague survivors of suicide loss for a very long time. Many struggle for years trying to make sense of their loved one’s death—and even longer making peace—if at all—with the unanswerable questions that linger.

Society still attaches a stigma to suicide. And as such, survivors of suicide loss may encounter blame, judgment or social exclusion – while mourners of loved ones who have died from terminal illness, accident, old age or other kinds of deaths usually receive sympathy and compassion. It’s strange how we would never blame a family member for a loved one’s cancer or Alzheimer’s, but society continues to cast a shadow on a loved one’s suicide.

What also makes grieving different is that when we lose a loved one to illness, old age or an accident, we retain happy memories. We can think back on our loved one and replay fond memories, share stories with joyful nostalgia. This is not so for the suicide survivor. They questions the memories, “Where they really good?” “Maybe he wasn’t really happy in this picture?”Why didn’t I see her emotional pain when we were on vacation?” Sometimes it becomes agonizing to connect to a memory or to share stories from the past—so survivors often divorce themselves from their loved one’s legacy.

Survivors of suicide loss not only experience these aspects of complicated grief, they are also prone to developing symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder—a direct result from their loved one’s suicide. The unspeakable sadness about the suicide becomes a circle of never ending bewilderment, pain, flashbacks and a need to numb the anguish.

Ways to Help a Survivor of Suicide Loss

If you know someone who has lost a loved one to suicide, there are many things you can do. In addition, by reaching out, you also help take stigma out of the equation.

  1. Don’t be afraid to acknowledge the death. Extend your condolences, express your feelings of sorrow. Make sure you use the loved one’s name. “My heart is so sad that John died.” Many who have lost someone to suicide have a broken heart, clinically called Stress Cardiomyopathy, and really need your empathy, compassion and understanding to heal.
  2. Ask the survivor if and how you can help. Though they may not be ready to accept help, asking signifies that you are there—not avoiding or distancing during this tragic event. The notion of being there if needed is extremely comforting for survivors.
  3. Encourage openness. Be accepting of however survivors need to express their feelings. It may be with silence, with sadness or even anger.
  4. Be patient. Don’t set a time limit for a survivor’s grief. Complicated grief can take years to process. Moreover, don’t limit a survivor’s need to share and repeat stories, conversations or wishes. Repetition is a key factor in grief recovery.
  5. Listen. Be a compassionate listener. This means don’t look to fix things. The greatest gift you can give someone you care about who has survived a suicide loss is your time, reassurance and love.

Ways to Help Yourself if You’re a Survivor of Suicide Loss

  1. Ground yourself:  It may be very painful, but you must learn to hold tightly to the truth that you are not responsible for your loved one’s suicide in any way, shape, or form.
  2. Don’t put a limit of your grief. Grieve in your own way, on your own time frame. It will take time to find a place for your sadness and loss. It may take even more time for you to feel hope again and envision possibilities.
  3. Plan ahead. When you feel ready, assist your family in finding ways to mark your loved one’s birthday, family holidays or other milestones. Understand that new moments, experiences or events will be met with sadness, even with emotional setbacks. Preparing for how you will move through these calendar dates will help minimize traumatic reactions.
  4. Make connections. Consider joining a support group specifically designed for survivors of suicide loss. The environment can provide a mutually supportive, reassuring healing environment unlike anywhere else.
  5. Give yourself permission. To cry. To laugh. To seek professional help if you need it. Remember that you are moving through the most difficult of losses—and you can take control of the path to healing.

 

Citations

  1. Feigelman, W., Gorman, B.S. & Jordan, J.R. (2009). Stigmatization and suicide bereavement. Death Studies, 33(7):591-608.

    Hendin H, et al. (2000). Therapists’ reactions to patients’ suicides. American Journal of Psychiatry, 157(12):2022–2027.

    Jordan, J. (2001). Is suicide bereavement different? A reassessment of the literature. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 31: 91–102.

    Sakinofsky I. (2007). The aftermath of suicide: Managing survivors’ bereavement.  Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 52(6):129S–136S.

    Sudak, H., Maxim, K., & Carpenter, M. (2008). Suicide and stigma: A review of the literature and personal reflections. Academic Psychiatry, 32(2):136-142.

    Young,  I. T. et. al. (2012). Suicide bereavement and complicated grief. Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience, 14(2):177-186.

     

    Psychology Today – Posted 25th November 2013

 

 

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace      Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10am-10pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10am-10pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

 

 

Could your experience of suicide help save someone’s life?

sane-australia-logo

Supporting someone who has attempted suicide can be a challenging experience.

Help SANE understand the impact of this support.

By completing the Better Support Survey you will help us examine the journey of a support person and identify what type of assistance or services help.
 
This 15-20 minute survey is open to people over 18 who’ve supported someone following a suicide attempt in the last ten years.
 
This research is being conducted by SANE Australia in partnership with the University of New England. 

 

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For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace      Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia help

SANE Australia Helpline  –  Talk to a mental health professional (weekdays, 10am-10pm AEST) 1800 18 72 63

Helpline chat – Chat online with a mental health professional (weekdays 10am-10pm AEST)

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

The LifeSpan Sites – Black Dog Institute

A comprehensive research trial of LifeSpan is being undertaken in 4 sites in NSW while implementation support is being provided by the LifeSpan team to sites across Australia.

LifeSpan NSW research trial

Funded by the Paul Ramsay Foundation and with the support of the NSW Government and the NSW Mental Health Commission, LifeSpan is being delivered and comprehensively evaluated in four NSW sites. This follows a rigorous selection process that was undertaken to select sites on the basis of need, community and stakeholder readiness, and capacity.

LifeSpan will be implemented using a staged roll out with each of the four sites supported to implement LifeSpan over a 2.5 year period.

  1. Newcastle: Hunter New England LHD in partnership with Hunter New England Central Coast Primary Health Network, Hunter Primary Care, Calvary Ltd and Everymind.
  2. Illawarra Shoalhaven: Coordinare – the South East NSW Primary Health Network
  3. Central Coast: Central Coast LHD
  4. Murrumbidgee: Murrumbidgee Primary Health Network

Supporting Commonwealth suicide prevention trial sites

The Black Dog Institute is funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health to provide support to the 12 Primary Health Networks selected as trial sites for the National Suicide Prevention Trials.

The 12 sites receiving support from the LifeSpan team are:

State/Territory Trial sites
Queensland 1. Townsville
2. Wide Bay, Sunshine Coast and Central Queensland
3. Brisbane North
Northern Territory 4. Darwin
Western Australia 5. Mid West, Country Western Australia
6. Perth South
7. Kimberley, Western Australia
New South Wales 8. North Coast
9. Western NSW
Victoria 10. North Western Melbourne
Tasmania 11. Tasmania
South Australia 12. Country South Australia

 

Lifespan sites page

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Why Aren’t We Talking About Suicide Attempt Survivors? Here Are 7 Ways to Support Them

Sam Dylan Finch

This was published on the April 3, 2015, but little has changed…

When we talk about suicide, we tend to focus on prevention – or mourning those that we have lost to suicide.

And while these are worthy and important causes, they sometimes make invisible a very real and important group of people.

We forget, too often, that some of us are on the other side – that not everyone who attempts suicide will die.

When I attempted suicide as a young teenager, I found myself set adrift.

I couldn’t find support or resources because those resources focused exclusively on either family members who have lost a loved one or preventing suicide attempts – neither of which applied to me at that time.

Confused and alone, I was unable to find a single website or article that acknowledged that sometimes, suicide doesn’t go the way we planned – sometimes, we live to tell the tale.

I went to school the next day, resuming business as usual, because I didn’t know what else to do.

Six years later, more resources are being created, and amazing projects are unfolding. I’m grateful, as an attempt survivor, to know that other survivors will have more of a safety net than I did.

However, I still believe that there are things we all can do to support suicide attempt survivors – and to create a culture in which these survivors do not feel invisible.

As feminists, I believe that this work is especially important and relevant – the stigma around mental health and suicide is a hurdle for folks in every community, and is most often shouldered by folks who are already marginalized in significant ways.

Here’s a list of seven ways we can all do right by attempt survivors

  1. Include Attempt Survivors in Your Conversations About Suicide

In any conversation about suicide – whether it’s a formal panel, a public policy discussion, or a casual conversation – it should never be assumed that survivors don’t exist.

And many of us are not only surviving, but also thriving. Others survive and continue to struggle.

If you’re doing work in prevention, for example, it’s important to remember that folks who have attempted suicide before are at even greater risk to attempt again.

In fact, one-third of people who attempt suicide will try again within one year.

Regardless, attempt survivors are an important demographic when we’re talking about prevention.

When organizing panels or conferences around mental health and suicide, there should be a concentrated effort to include survivors not just as attendees, but as speakers and organizers.

If you already support a particular mental health organization, you can also inquire about what they are doing to support attempt survivors.

And in everyday conversation, remember that attempting suicide is not synonymous with dying.

Including attempt survivors in conversations that impact our lives is an important part of making survivors visible.

  1. Stop Treating Suicide Like a Taboo Topic

I know that suicide sounds really scary. I know that it can be hard to have conversations about it.

However, when we treat suicide like a hush-hush topic, we’re not only hurting people who may be suicidal and need help, we’re also hurting people who have been through an attempt and need a safe space to talk about it.

When we don’t have healthy, compassionate conversations about suicide and survival, we ultimately discourage survivors from seeking out support.

After my attempt, there was no script on how to talk about what I’d been through. I just knew in my gut that it wasn’t something that people talked about.

If I had felt safer or more encouraged to open up, I might have been able to cope more effectively and get help sooner.

In fact, if it hadn’t been so taboo, I might have talked about my suicidal thoughts before I acted, and my attempt might have never happened.

We need to stop treating suicide and suicidal thoughts as taboo.

Instead, we need to foster conversations that can help survivors feel safe enough to disclose their experiences and seek help when it’s needed.

  1. Stop Shaming Survivors

Part of my decision to keep what had happened to me a secret for so many years was because I had heard, over and over again, that suicide was a selfish decision.

I was afraid that if I opened up to someone, I would be met with shaming and criticism instead of compassion.

Put simply: We need to stop shaming people who have attempted suicide.

The decision to end our lives is not a decision we ever take lightly – and it’s not indicative of a character flaw, but rather of immense pain that we have carried for too long.

Attempt survivors face enormous amounts of discrimination – and it’s compounded because we not only face the stigma of being suicide attempt survivors, but often that which goes with struggling with our mental health.

We’re not only “selfish”, but we’re “crazy“, we’re “unstable”, we’re “unhinged”; in other words, we’re worthless.

A culture that either pretends we don’t exist or treats us as selfish and subhuman is a culture that ultimately perpetuates the cycle of suicide.

If we are encouraged to keep silent and told we are less than human, we are far more likely to attempt suicide again.

If we want to support attempt survivors, we need to stop shaming them into silence.

  1. Don’t Assume That Suicide Attempts Are a Universal Experience

Some of us are traumatized by our experience. Some of us don’t have strong feelings about what happened. Some of us consider our attempts life-changing. Some of us view them as one terrible event in our lives. Some of us feel regret about our attempt. Some of us feel no regret at all.

Some of us feel all of these things at different times in our lives – sometimes even at different points in a single day.

There is no universal narrative that fits for every suicide attempt survivor.

All of our experiences are valid, all of our experiences are important, and all of our experiences are unique.

When we talk about suicide attempts, we need to be careful not to generalize about those experiences or about survivors.

By acknowledging the complexity and diversity of our experiences, we support all survivors, instead of just those who fit into our preconceived ideas of what a survivor should be.

If we want to be supportive, we need to be supportive of everyone, regardless of what their journey looks like.

  1. Tune In When Survivors Are Sharing Their Stories

There are many survivors that are already sharing their stories, and you may someday encounter someone who trusts you with their story. The most important thing is to listen – and to let them take the lead.

I’ve found that when I share my story with folks, people have a lot of questions and don’t always know how to respectfully engage.

To this, I would suggest that people should actively listen when survivors are sharing their stories. Don’t interrupt, don’t interrogate, don’t ask invasive questions.

Let survivors decide how much to share, when to share, and how their stories will be told.

I know that suicide is a topic we don’t often hear about, and when someone is willing to open up, there’s a lot that we want to know.

However, a person’s attempt story is not about you – this is a story about them, by them, for them.

If there is an opportunity to ask questions, be sure to ask in a way that allows this person to opt out if they aren’t ready to answer.

Survivors deserve to disclose their stories in an environment that makes them feel safe, validated, and respected.

You can facilitate this by listening, first and foremost.

  1. Realize That We Are Everywhere

It’s gut wrenching when an acquaintance, not knowing my history, says something terrible like, “Ugh! If I have to go to work on Saturday, I’ll kill myself.”

We, as a culture, need to recognize that attempt survivors are in every community – and then we need to behave accordingly.

We need to speak compassionately about suicide not only because it’s the right thing to do (suicide jokes are never funny, especially when they aren’t coming from folks who have lived it), but because triggering survivors is another way that we both invisibilize and marginalize them.

We assume that survivors aren’t around, and thus we say things that we wouldn’t otherwise say to someone who has been through it.

There are many microaggressions that survivors face, by virtue of the assumption that we do not exist or that we only exist in certain communities.

Suicide should always be discussed in a way that is sensitive, inclusive, and does not uphold discrimination or shame, so that survivors in every community can feel safe and respected.

  1. Get Behind the Amazing Organizations, Resources, and Projects That Support Attempt Survivors

Suicide attempt survivors need resources, too. This is why supporting the organizations, resources, and projects that advocate and assist attempt survivors is absolutely vital.

Unlike six years ago when I had my attempt, Googling “suicide attempt survivor” lists a number of resources that now exist for survivors – some of which are quite fantastic.

One essential resource can be found over at Grief Speaks. The guide, found here, gives a comprehensive run-down of ways we can assist someone in the aftermath of a suicide attempt. If those close to me had had something like this, it would have made all the difference.

One of my favorite projects is called Live Through This, the amazing work of attempt survivor Dese’Rae L. Stage. She photographs and documents the stories of attempt survivors from all walks of life.

It’s the only known project of its kind, bringing a human face to a struggle that is too often anonymous.

When I first saw this project, I was struck by how whole it made me feel. To know that there were others like me, living through this and telling their stories, gave me the courage to keep telling my story, too.

Supporting the work of survivors and advocates like Stage is a way of both bringing visibility to survivors, as well as creating a greater safety net for future survivors who need to know that they are cared for, seen, and – most of all – not alone.

* * *

My suicide attempt was not the worst thing that had ever happened to me.

I think what was worse was the loneliness I felt when I realized I didn’t know how to talk about it, and I didn’t have a safe space to have that conversation.

As an adult, I know that I’m not alone in my experience. There are so many attempt survivors worldwide, and many feel unsupported, isolated, and shamed into silence.

However, there’s so much we can all do to make attempt survivors feel more supported.

This list is a place to start, and should be part of an ongoing conversation about how to make survivors feel safer, respected, and visible.

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For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace      Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia Helpline 1800 18 7263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

Recovering From A Suicide Attempt

Fighting for a Future

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Yesterday I started writing my blog after three months absence following a suicide attempt. I know the first three months are the most crucial in recovery following an attempt. Most repeated attempts follow in that time period. Here are five steps that are helping me recover from my suicide attempt:

1. Accepting treatment. 

If I had cancer, you can bet I would take chemo. I might also listen to the naturopath’s advice to drink special juices and cut out refined sugars, or to follow the path of meditation to wholeness. But I would still take chemo.

Mental illness is a real thing. A disease. When the doctor says the chemicals in your brain aren’t firing correctly and a certain medication will help level you out, listen to the doctor.

It took a few tries to find the meds that were right for me, but it’s worth the hassle. Some…

View original post 2,043 more words

Improving emergency and follow-up care for suicidal crisis – a Lifespan strategy

ED services

What we know?

A suicide attempt is the strongest risk factor for subsequent suicide. To reduce the risk of future attempts, a coordinated approach to care for people after a suicide attempt is essential.

Coordination of care is complex and emergency departments are high-pressure environments where staff are time poor.

Often people who present in emergency departments (EDs) for suicidal thinking or attempts don’t receive the care and support they need.

Evidence shows that it is the experience rather than strict adherence to a protocol that makes the difference between good and poor care. When people seek help, services need to make them feel validated, welcome and heard.

What is happening?

  • Improved crisis care with new guidelines and training in EDs, education and resource packs distributed to individuals and families in crisis.
  • Dedicated aftercare services for people who attempt suicide.
  • Better networks and information sharing between care providers and families.

Strategy Summary – Emergency and follow-up care

This brochure provides community members with a summary of the evidence, what is happening and how you can get involved.

Download the brochure

Research Summary – Emergency and follow-up care 

This document provides a detailed summary of the evidence covering why the strategy is included in LifeSpan, evidence supporting the interventions recommended by LifeSpan, and how this strategy will be evaluated as part of the LifeSpan NSW Research trial.

Download the research summary

Guidelines for integrated suicide-related crisis and follow-up care in Emergency Departments and other acute settings

Recommended strategies and an accompanying Clinical Summary, produced by Black Dog in collaboration with leading clinicians and those with a lived experience of suicide attempt.

Download the PDF (3031 KB)

To find out how you can support this initiative and help make a difference, please visit www.lifespan.org.au

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace      Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline Australia 1300 78 99 78 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia Helpline 1800 18 7263

Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families

And in your heart…

the truth about your heart

In your head…

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Link to photo