PTSD & Suicide: David Conroy PhD

David Conroy is “a recovering suicidal person and an advocate for the suicidal”. Here is what he has to say about the relationship of PTSD to suicidal experience.

It makes a great deal of sense to me…

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According to its definition, PTSD may result when a person suffers an event or situation that is outside the range of normal experience, exceeds the individual’s perceived ability to meet its demands, and poses a serious threat to the loss of life.

Combat veterans, sexual assault survivors, and other victims of trauma are vulnerable to a condition called Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). People with PTSD suffer from a range of symptoms that interfere with their capacities to enjoy normal life.

People who suffered suicidal conditions, particularly conditions that were chronic, recurrent, or included one or more attempts, may also be victims of PTSD. According to its definition, PTSD may result when a person suffers an event or situation that is outside the range of normal experience, exceeds the individuals perceived ability to meet its demands, and poses a serious threat to the loss of life.

Suicidal people meet the formal criteria for PTSD. Severe and prolonged suicidal pain is not something that most people suffer. People in suicidal crises feel that they are at the breaking point of what they can cope with. Since 30,000 people die by suicide each year in the United States, it is a condition that poses a serious threat to the loss of life.

Many of us are haunted by memories of acute crises, acts of self-injury, or extended periods of severe depression. Like citizens of a besieged city, we lived through periods of time in which we had a realistic and unrelenting fear that we would soon be dead. We suffer PTSD simply from having been suicidal, independently of whatever particular traumas may have contributed to our becoming suicidal, such as abuse during childhood or exposure to the violent death of someone else. Our suicide PTSD is also distinct from whatever traumatic events may happen as a result of being suicidal, such as involuntary hospitalization or job discrimination. Undoubtedly, most of us suffered many types of traumatic events in our lives, and these events and their consequences need to be addressed in recovery. But the suicidal crises themselves may be events that induce PTSD.

The PTSD literature for veterans and sex assault survivors lists conditions that are commonly found among survivors of those types of trauma. Survivors typically have only some of these symptoms, and the severity of a particular symptom may vary from individual to individual. Survivors of different types of traumatic events often have a different range of symptoms. A remarkably large number of these conditions are common among people with long-term histories of suicidal pain:

  • Problems with memory. Persistent, intrusive, and vivid memories concerning the traumatic situation. Events of daily life may trigger distressing memories related to the trauma. Memory lapses for parts of the traumatic situation. Many suicidal people are troubled by strong images, such as the feeling that they have bombs inside their bodies or a knife over their heads, and in recovery continue to be bothered by the memory of having had these images.
  • Avoidance of things associated with the traumatic experience.
  • Denial on the seriousness of the experience.
  • Persistent anxiety.
  • Fear that the traumatic situation will recur. The trauma is often an event that shatters the survivors sense of invulnerability to harm.
  • Disturbed by the intrusiveness of violent impulses and thoughts.
  • Engagement in risk-taking behavior to produce adrenaline.
  • A feeling of being powerless over the traumatic event. Anger and frustration over being powerless.
  • A feeling of being helpless about ones current condition.
  • Being dramatically and permanently changed by the experience.
  • A sense of unfairness. Why did this happen to me?
  • Holding oneself responsible for what happened. Feeling guilty.
  • The use of self-blame to provide an illusion of control. Sexual assault survivors often blame themselves: If I hadn’t been at that location, worn those clothes, behaved in that way, then it wouldn’t have happened. This pattern is also found in the survivors of a completed suicide. If I had only done x, the suicide would not have happened, can be used to try to cope with the fear that suicide will happen again in the family–i.e., it is preventable if I just manage things differently. The suicidal are often full of self-blame. As in the other cases it is partly due to an internalization of social attitudes that blame the victim or family, and also due to the effort to gain mastery over the situation. To imagine we could have done more is more tolerable than total helplessness.
  • An inability to experience the joys of life.
  • Feelings of being alienated from the other people and society in general. I am different. I am shameful. If they knew what I was like, they would reject me. I don’t belong in this world. I’m a freak, an outcast.
  • When people with PTSD try to return to normal life, they are plagued by readjustment problems in the basic elements of life. They have difficulties in relationships, in employment, and in having families.
  • A lack of caring attachments. A sense of a lack of purpose and meaning.
  • Some chronically traumatized people lose the sense that they have a self at all.
  • Veterans report the feeling that they never really made it back from the war. Formerly suicidal people feel they never really made it back to normal life.
  • One Viet Nam veteran with PTSD said, I don’t have any friends and I am pretty particular about who I want as a friend.
  • PTSD was aggravated for Viet Nam veterans because they returned to a country that had negative attitudes toward them. For sexual assault survivors, stigmatization is the second injury.
  • When Viet Nam veterans returned home people were angry at them. They had shamed the country, they had done something wrong, they were potentially harmful to others, it was dangerous to be with them. Sexual assault survivors may receive angry responses–on the grounds that they have done something that shames the family. Suicide attempters often experience great anger from family and care providers.
  • A deep distrust of co-workers, employers, authorities.
  • Left with unexpressed rage against those who were indifferent to their situation and who failed to help them.
  • In personal relationships there are problems of dependency and trust. A fear of being abandoned, betrayed, let down. A belief that people will be hurtful if given a chance. Feelings of self-hatred and humiliation for being needy, weak, and vulnerable. Alternating between isolation and anxious clinging.
  • Trauma often causes the victim to view the world as malevolent, rather than benign.
  • No sense of having a future, or, the belief that ones future will be very limited.
  • Feel that they belong more to the dead than to the living.
  • The feeling of having a negative Midas touch–everything I get involved with goes bad.
  • Loss of self-confidence, and loss of feelings of mastery and competence.
  • A resistance to efforts to change a maladaptive world view that results from the trauma.
  • A mistrust of counselors ability to listen.
  • People who suffered traumatic experiences as children, teenagers, or young adults may simultaneously become prematurely aged and developmentally arrested. A part of them feels old. Another part feels stuck at the age they had when the trauma occurred.
  • PTSD can be worse if the sufferer experiences the trauma as an individual rather than as a member of a group of people who are suffering the same situation. Unlike earlier wars in which units went overseas together and returned together, in Viet Nam each soldier had an individual DEROS (Date of Expected Return from Overseas). This reduced unit cohesiveness; each soldier experienced the war from an individual point of view. Suicidal people experience their near-death situation with extreme isolation. They see their conditions as being completely unique – terminal uniqueness. They have no sense of identification with others.
  • The severity of PTSD symptoms tends to increase with the severity and duration of the trauma.
  • The use of alcohol or drugs to cope with the PTSD symptoms.
  • Attempts to do things to gain a feeling of mastery over the traumatic situation, e.g., become a volunteer on a hotline.

These kinds of conditions may be found again and again in the chronically suicidal. Upon reflection, it should not be surprising that we should suffer PTSD. Many of us suffered from suicidal pain for years – and years – and years. The idea of dying is terrifying. We recoil at thoughts of dying by automobile accident, plane crash, murder, cancer, AIDS, drowning, suffocation. The idea of dying violently simply by forces generated from within ourselves is in some ways almost too horrible to apprehend. How could anyone survive such a prolonged siege of pain and terror – and remain unaffected?

Survivors of traumatic experiences are often told, Its in the past. Forget about it and get on with your life, Why cant you just forget about all that, and enjoy life like a normal person? If we could simply get on with life, they would have done it. PTSD helps explain why it is so hard for the chronically suicidal to recover. Because we were suicidal, we subsequently suffered many of the conditions associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. These conditions are serious problems in their own right; they are formidable barriers in the recovery process.

We can heal from the original trauma, and we can heal from the PTSD conditions that have plagued us since the trauma. The basic steps of PTSD recovery programs provide helpful guidelines:

    1. an environment that is physically and emotionally safe
    2. treatment for addictive behaviors
    3. patience: PTSD recovery takes time
    4. caring attachments
    5. restore sense of mastery
    6. rest and relaxation
    7. recall the traumatic event(s) in small steps
    8. gradually assimilate painful feelings and memories
    9. fully experience fear, anger, shame, guilt, depression
    10. grieve ones losses

In a support group we have a chance to talk about our suicidal histories without the fear that we will be taken to a hospital for doing so. We can talk about the isolation, the fears, the pain, the confusion, the acts of self-injury, the behavior of others that was stigmatizing, denying, abusive, the horrible sense of estrangement that exists when you are in a terrible situation and there is no one who understands what you are going through, the hatred and contempt for oneself and the world, the debilitating sense of personal weakness. We see that we are not alone. We do not have the seriousness of our condition minimized, denied, or belittled. With time, the pain abates and the troublesome PTSD symptoms diminish.

By David L. Conroy, PhD. Reprinted with permission

 

Beyond Blue Suicide Prevention Help

Beyond Blue

Suicide

Suicide is the leading cause of death for Australians aged between 15 and 44, with around 3,000 people dying by suicide every year. That’s an average of eight people every day.1 For every suicide, there are tragic ripple effects for friends, families, colleagues and the broader community.

If someone you know seems to be struggling, reach out and connect with them. Showing that you care could make a huge difference. If you find that you are struggling, it might feel better to reach out for support, talk to someone and make some positive changes, rather than doing it alone.

Beyond Blue

beyondblue has developed this site to provide information for people who have lost someone to suicide, those worried about a friend or family member, or anyone who may be feeling suicidal.

Health in Difference 2018

Call for Applications for Presentations and Abstracts

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Health in Difference 2018 / 11-13 April 2018
The 10th National LGBTI Health Conference
www.healthindifference.org

It’s time to submit your application to present at Health in Difference 2018!

Make sure your voice, your organisation, your work/research, and your community is represented at this important national event.

Health in Difference is Australia’s premier conference on the health and wellbeing of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, intersex, queer and sexuality, gender, and bodily diverse people and communities throughout Australia.

This conference brings together community members, community organisations large and small, health practitioners, researchers, academics, policy makers, advocates, and others who are interested in improving the mental, physical and emotional wellbeing of LGBTI people.

Applications close 30 November 2017

Call for Presentations NOW OPEN

  • Do you have a passion for LGBTI Health and Wellbeing?
  • Are you doing innovative work in your research, projects, or organisation and want to share the learning on a national stage?

Health in Difference is famous for the broad scope of it’s conference program and the diversity represented by the conference delegates. We welcome presentations on a wide range of topics.

Get in fast, as the Call for Presentations will close 30 November 2017

Click here for full details

Call for Workshops NOW OPEN

  • Do you have a great idea for an interactive capacity building workshop?
  • Do you have a creative idea for sharing your experience, wisdom, and expertise with delegates?

Alongside traditional conference presentations, panels, and posters, we are excited to offer a stream dedicated entirely to capacity building workshops.

These workshops will be dynamic, interactive, and encourage an exchange between presenters and participants.

Get in fast, as the Call for Workshops will close 30 November 2017

Click here for full details

Register now to attend Health in Difference 2018!

Secure your place as a delegate at Australia’s premier LGBTI Health and Wellbeing conference – Health in Difference 2018!

To register at EARLYBIRD rates, visit: www.healthindifference.org/registration

We are excited to provide a range of delegate packages to suit different budgets and organisations. Find out more about the key dates and prices for attending HiD2018 here. We have also negotiated some great discounts on accommodation just for delegates.

ACKNOWLEDGE­MENT OF COUNTRY

The Alliance acknowledges the Traditional Owners of country throughout Australia, their diversity, histories and knowledge and their continuing connections to land, water and community. We pay our respects to all Australian Indigenous Peoples and their cultures, and to Elders of past, present and future generations.

QPR Institute Australia

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The QPR Institute Australia website was launched on Friday 8th September, just before World Suicide Prevention Day on 10th September. The website will provide Australians in a range of professions with ready access to the wide variety of QPR training courses developed by Dr Paul Quinnett, clinical psychologist and founder of the QPR Institute, and his team of experts. Dr Paul Quinnett has worked in the field for over 35 years, written 7 books and been on the Board of the American Association of Suicidology.

What does QPR mean?

Q Question

P Persuade

R Refer

QPR stands for Question, Persuade, and Refer — the 3 simple steps anyone can learn to help save a life from suicide.

Just as people trained in CPR help save thousands of lives each year, people trained in QPR learn how to recognize the warning signs of a suicide crisis and how to question, persuade, and refer someone to help. Each year thousands of Australians, like you, are saying “Yes” to saving the life of a friend, colleague, sibling, or neighbour.

QPR can be learned in our Gatekeeper course in as little as one hour, but two hours is preferred.

QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention is listed in the National Registry of Evidence-based Practices and Policies as published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration at: www.samhsa.gov.

Suicide Prevention Training Courses

The QPR Gatekeeping Training for Suicide Prevention course which is designed to inform and upskill the general public in being able to intervene appropriately to assist people who are at risk of suicide. This course is listed in the National Registry of Evidence-based Practices and Policies (NREPP). The QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention course is currently on sale at a special price of $20, reduced from RRP $40 for the month of World Suicide Prevention Day (expires 10/10/17).

• The Suicide Triage Training course which is designed to suit youth workers, school and career guidance counsellors, pastoral care workers, mental health case managers and other welfare professionals.

• Customised advanced professional courses which are designed to meet the practice needs of specific health and welfare professionals including: Nurses, Physicians, Allied Health Professionals, Mental health practitioners, Law enforcement officers, Corrections officers, Firefighters and emergency service personnel, Sport coaches and staff, Clergy, and Crisis line volunteers. Suicide bereavement, grief and trauma course is coming soon.

These online courses are accessible at qprinstituteaustralia.com.au. The cost for each course varies and full details are available on this web site.

Dr Paul Quinnett says, “Since 1996 nearly three million US citizens have been trained in QPR, a CPR intervention equivalent for mental health emergencies. Numerous national surveys have found a large training deficit among front-line professionals tasked with preventing suicide. QPR Institute worked with dozens of professional groups to better train professionals by creating and customizing a full library of QPR-based online training programs to meet specific work site needs. The online library includes customized training for a wide variety of professionals who are often in the best possible position to intercept a suicidal person during the workday. These online courses received high marks from professionals who completed the training.  We are very excited to bring these life-saving training programs to Australia through our newly established QPR Institute Australia. Working together, we can all save lives.”

QPR online courses vary in length from 2 hours to more than 6 hours. They are interactive and use proven, multi-media e-learning teaching techniques. The modular format means that these courses can be undertaken at a time and place that best suits the learner, including from any PC or mobile device.

All QPR courses are evidence-based, heavily tested and peer reviewed and the majority of courses are listed in the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) Best Practice Registry.

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What is a Gatekeeper?

According to the Surgeon General’s National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (2001), a gatekeeper is someone in a position to recognize a crisis and the warning signs that someone may be contemplating suicide.

Gatekeepers can be anyone, but include parents, friends, neighbours, teachers, ministers, doctors, nurses, office supervisors, squad leaders, foremen, police officers, advisors, caseworkers, firefighters, and many others who are strategically positioned to recognize and refer someone at risk of suicide.

As a QPR-trained Gatekeeper you will learn to:

• Recognize the warning signs of suicide

• Know how to offer hope

• Know how to get help and save a life

About QPR Institute Australia

A key objective of QPR Institute Australia is to increase the uptake of QPR on-line and face-to-face training programs in Australia, thereby equipping Australians with the skills and confidence that will enable them to intervene appropriately to the save the lives of those at risk of suicide.

Our Mission

To save lives and reduce suicidal behaviours by providing innovative, practical and proven suicide prevention training. We believe that quality education empowers all people, regardless of their background, to make a positive difference in the life of someone they know.

For more information, please visit the QPR Institute Australia website qprinstituteaustralia.com.au. Please contact via email admin@qprinstituteaustralia.com.au or Alan Staines, alanstaines@optusnet.com.au or 02 9890 2400 / 0412 164 575.

The Need

Suicide is one of the most critical health concerns, both in Australia and on a global scale. In 2015, over 3000 Australians died by suicide. For every suicide death, as many as 25 individuals will attempt suicide, and for some communities, such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and LGBTI people, rates of suicide attempts and deaths are even higher.

Over the past decade in Australia, there has been a 20% increase in the number of suicides and suicide is the leading cause of death for Australians aged 15-44.

We also know that suicide rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are at least twice that of non-Indigenous Australians, and that while women make more suicide attempts, 75% of suicides are by men.

Some people in the community are particularly vulnerable, for example men aged 18 to 24 who have previously served in the Australian Defense Forces are twice as likely to die by suicide as men of the same age in the general population.

Other workforces with higher risk of suicide can include those working in agricultural, transport and construction and health sectors.

Clearly, the need for QPR training across the community is very high.

Dr. Paul Quinnett said, “We are training at least 10,000 people a month with at least 5,000 instructors.  The program is called QPR – Question, Persuade and Refer. In essence, it is suicide prevention training.”

“How you ask the question is less important than that you ask it. The question may be as simple as ‘Are you considering suicide?’  If they say, ‘Yes’ you should listen to them.  Listen to them tell their story, their history and their emotional struggles.  Don’t pass judgement.  Don’t interrupt them.  Sometimes just the act of listening can stave off a suicide.”

Paul Quinnett says it is vital people are urged to go and see somebody who can help … such as a doctor, counsellor or psychologist.

Alan Staines from Postvention Australia says “QPR online training programs are a community program which provides critical information about the warning signs and how to ask the question. We think that QPR is essential for everyone in the community, thereby reducing the tragic loss to suicide. Suicide is everybody’s business.”

You may know someone who has made a suicide attempt, or may even know someone who died by suicide. It is likely you know someone who has thought, or is thinking, about suicide.

If you are a professional caregiver, police officer, fireman, coach, teacher, youth leader, paramedic, school counsellor, case manager, volunteer or paid staff in any of a hundred different kinds of organisations, you very likely have had first-hand contact with someone who has contemplated suicide.

 

If in crisis or in need of counselling, please contact the following telephone lines:

• Lifeline 13 11 14 (24 hour phone counselling)

• Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

• Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

• Mensline Australia 1300 789 978 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

• Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families)

Are you a stakeholder in Suicide Prevention?

AISRAP

Suicide Prevention Education Priorities for the Workforce

AISRAP wants 10 minutes of your time – tell them your thoughts on suicide prevention education

GU Ethics Ref No. 2017/803

The Australian Institute for Suicide Research and Prevention (AISRAP) Griffith University, is undertaking a major curriculum review of its post graduate tertiary based programs, the Master of Suicidology and Graduate Certificate in Suicide Prevention Studies.

We would like to modify our programs in a way that is informed not only by international and national cutting edge research in suicide prevention, but by workforce needs and perspectives. Therefore, as a stakeholder in the suicide prevention field, we are genuinely interested in the views you have of our existing program curriculum, as well as any additional ideas and needs of your organization or profession that our programs may be designed to meet.

CLICK on the link just below to ENTER SURVEY.

Education Priorities for Suicide Prevention Workforce: Stakeholder Views

What would I be asked to do? How much time would it take?

The questionnaire will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Participation is voluntary and the results are anonymous.  You may withdraw at any time.

Please note: regards to maintaining your own privacy and that of others, that if you choose to make comments on any postings or media adverts concerning this study, you should be aware of the potential dangers of accidental public exposure of your own personal details, identifiable information and that of others when you make such  comments or ‘share’ the media post etc.

How can I find out more?

The research is being conducted by Ms Jacinta Hawgood  (Senior Lecturer, AISRAP), and has had design input from Alumni students Ms Ingrid Ozols and Ms Maddeline Mooney.  Further details are contained within the survey link.

If you have any other questions please feel free to contact:

Chief Investigator: Ms Jacinta Hawgood,

Email: jacinta.hawgood@griffith.edu.au

Ph: 07 3735 3394 (Wed-Friday)

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Suicide Callback Service     1300 659 467

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace      Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline 1300 78 99 78

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia Helpline 1800 18 7263

“Lessons for Life”, SANE Australia

The experiences of people who attempt suicide:
A qualitative research report

“Factors that promote recovery

Professional support (16), access to effective and affordable
treatments (17), and support from family and friends (16)
were mentioned the most frequently in terms of what helped
participants. People also talked of learning better coping
mechanisms and insight (11), having people understand and not
judge them, having others (5) check in to make sure that they
are OK, and better communication and increased connectedness
(4). Five of the participants also highlighted that the beginning
of a new life stage – in particular the responsibility of having
children – helped them on their path to recovery. Being involved
in less stressful work or volunteering (4), and becoming aware
of the impact that suicide has on others (5), were also cited
as reasons for their progression towards better mental health.
These results mirror findings by Chelsey and Loring-McNulty
(2003) showing that suicide survivors draw on a range of
supports in helping them with their suicidal feelings.

Alison talks about the importance of an ongoing relationship
with a mental health professional as a way to stay well:
‘I knew that for me getting ongoing access to either psychological
or psychiatric therapy was critical. For me, it’s like, you know,
going to the gym. So this is what I do to keep myself well mentally,
and if I don’t do that then sooner or later life happens, enough you
know, that there is more going on than I can actually deal with and
process. And the more I have to put things in the cupboard without
dealing with them, without processing them, then it builds up to
a critical level and then I get depressed because the skeletons are
rattling and I can’t deal with them.’
Alison (50)” (Page 27).

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Lessons for Life

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Suicide Callback Service     1300 659 467

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace      Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline 1300 78 99 78

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527                                                                                               Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia Helpline 1800 18 7263

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Please live – Suicide Survivors

Six young people talk about a friend they lost to suicide

Please live video

Black Dog Institute Panel Discussion: Towards best practice care for suicidal crisis in the Emergency Department

Live stream or Hospital Road Randwick NSW 2031

Wednesday, November 1, 2017   06:00 PM – 07:30 PM FREE – Choose to attend in person in Sydney or join the live stream – register online now

Registration/details

Title

Integrated suicide-related crisis and follow-up care in Emergency Departments and other acute settings

Duration

1 hour

Program Outline

Evidence suggests that effective crisis and follow-up care in Emergency Departments and other acute care settings is key to reducing suicide rates. However, resourcing, capacity and available skill-mix create significant and ongoing barriers to successful implementation. Join our panel of researchers, clinicians and consumers as we explore optimal strategies for both regional and urban acute care settings and discuss how these strategies can be implemented within the current environment.

About the guidelines

Integrated suicide-related crisis and follow-up care in Emergency Departments and other acute settings are a series of recommended strategies and and an accompanying clinical implementation guide. These have been produced by the Black Dog Institute’s LifeSpan initiative in collaboration with leading clinicians and those with a lived experience of suicide attempt. The recommendations form a central part of one of the nine LifeSpan strategies that, when implemented simultaneously, could reduce suicide by up to 20% and suicide attempts by up to 30%.

Accreditation

N/A

Suitable for

LifeSpan trial site staff, emergency department health professionals, hospital managers and administrators, mental health nurses, social workers, psychiatrists, acute care psychologists

Topics Covered

  • Suicide prevention
  • Emergency Department policy and guidelines
  • Lived experience framework

Learning Objectives

  • Learn and share with other health professionals
  • Gain access to expertise, clinical knowledge and insights from our highly experienced panel

For help in Australia

CAPS: Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Suicide Callback Service     1300 659 467

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace      Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline 1300 78 99 78

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527         Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

LifeSpan strategies and components CRESP & Black Dog Institute

Lifespan is being trialed in 4 sites in NSW and 12 sites around Australia

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Lifespan summary document

About lifespan

LifeSpan involves the implementation of nine evidence-based strategies simultaneously within a localised area. This integrated systems approach is predicted to prevent 21% of suicide deaths, and 30% of suicide attempts.

The nine LifeSpan strategies

LifeSpan involves the implementation of nine evidence-based strategies from population level to the individual, implemented simultaneously within a localised region. For successful delivery, all strategies require a thorough consultation and review process to ensure their relevance and tailoring to the local context and community.

Multiple strategies = more lives saved

Recognising that multiple strategies implemented at the same time are likely to generate bigger effects than just the sum of its parts (i.e., due to synergistic effects). LifeSpan offers a data driven, evidence-based approach, setting it apart from current practice and raising the bar in suicide prevention.

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For help in Australia

Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Suicide Callback Service     1300 659 467

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace      Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline 1300 78 99 78

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527         Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

Advertisements

The Suicide Call Back Service

The Suicide Call Back Service is a 24 hour, nationwide service in Australia that provides free telephone, video and online counselling. Call anywhere and anytime on 1300 659 467

Suicide Call Back Service

About-Us-Landing

Professionally trained counsellors with specialist skills in working with suicide-related issues and can help people to work through the pain and distress they may be feeling.

The Suicide Call Back Service offers crisis support to anyone in Australia who is aged 15 years and older.

They can help anyone who is affected by suicide, which includes:

 

If it is an emergency, please dial 000

The Suicide Call Back Service is funded by the Australian Government’s Department of Health

Worried about suicide?

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Beyond Blue Resources

Worried about someone

Sometimes, life can present overwhelming situations that can be difficult to deal with and people might consider suicide as a possible solution to end their pain. People with depression or anxiety are also more likely to attempt suicide than other people.

We can all play a role in preventing suicide by looking out for possible warning signs, reaching out and talking about it.

If you are in an emergency, or an immediate risk of harm to yourself or others, please contact emergency services on 000. For other support services go to Get support now.

What are the warning signs?

Someone who is thinking about suicide will usually give some clues or signs to people around them, though these may be subtle. Suicide prevention starts with recognising the warning signs and taking them seriously.

Reasons for suicidal feelings

There are many reasons why someone considers suicide, which can be quite complex, but there are certain indications that may help us determine whether a person could be at risk of suicide.

Talking to someone about your suicidal feelings

It can be very difficult to know what to do when you are having distressing thoughts about suicide. You may be ashamed to talk about it or worry that people will judge you, or not take you seriously. However, talking to someone you trust and feel comfortable with about how you are feeling can help.

Having a conversation with someone you’re worried about

If you’re worried that someone you care for is considering suicide, ask if they’re OK, share your concern, offer to listen or support them by going to see a professional together.

Getting through difficult moments

If you or someone close to you is experiencing suicidal thoughts or feelings, safety planning can help you get through the tough moments.

It involves creating a structured plan – ideally with support from your health professional or someone you trust – that you work through when you’re experiencing suicidal thoughts, feelings, distress or crisis.

 

Beyond Blue Suicide Prevention Help

Beyond Blue

Suicide

Suicide is the leading cause of death for Australians aged between 15 and 44, with around 3,000 people dying by suicide every year. That’s an average of eight people every day.1 For every suicide, there are tragic ripple effects for friends, families, colleagues and the broader community.

If someone you know seems to be struggling, reach out and connect with them. Showing that you care could make a huge difference. If you find that you are struggling, it might feel better to reach out for support, talk to someone and make some positive changes, rather than doing it alone.

Beyond Blue

beyondblue has developed this site to provide information for people who have lost someone to suicide, those worried about a friend or family member, or anyone who may be feeling suicidal.

Health in Difference 2018

Call for Applications for Presentations and Abstracts

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Health in Difference 2018 / 11-13 April 2018
The 10th National LGBTI Health Conference
www.healthindifference.org

It’s time to submit your application to present at Health in Difference 2018!

Make sure your voice, your organisation, your work/research, and your community is represented at this important national event.

Health in Difference is Australia’s premier conference on the health and wellbeing of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, intersex, queer and sexuality, gender, and bodily diverse people and communities throughout Australia.

This conference brings together community members, community organisations large and small, health practitioners, researchers, academics, policy makers, advocates, and others who are interested in improving the mental, physical and emotional wellbeing of LGBTI people.

Applications close 30 November 2017

Call for Presentations NOW OPEN

  • Do you have a passion for LGBTI Health and Wellbeing?
  • Are you doing innovative work in your research, projects, or organisation and want to share the learning on a national stage?

Health in Difference is famous for the broad scope of it’s conference program and the diversity represented by the conference delegates. We welcome presentations on a wide range of topics.

Get in fast, as the Call for Presentations will close 30 November 2017

Click here for full details

Call for Workshops NOW OPEN

  • Do you have a great idea for an interactive capacity building workshop?
  • Do you have a creative idea for sharing your experience, wisdom, and expertise with delegates?

Alongside traditional conference presentations, panels, and posters, we are excited to offer a stream dedicated entirely to capacity building workshops.

These workshops will be dynamic, interactive, and encourage an exchange between presenters and participants.

Get in fast, as the Call for Workshops will close 30 November 2017

Click here for full details

Register now to attend Health in Difference 2018!

Secure your place as a delegate at Australia’s premier LGBTI Health and Wellbeing conference – Health in Difference 2018!

To register at EARLYBIRD rates, visit: www.healthindifference.org/registration

We are excited to provide a range of delegate packages to suit different budgets and organisations. Find out more about the key dates and prices for attending HiD2018 here. We have also negotiated some great discounts on accommodation just for delegates.

ACKNOWLEDGE­MENT OF COUNTRY

The Alliance acknowledges the Traditional Owners of country throughout Australia, their diversity, histories and knowledge and their continuing connections to land, water and community. We pay our respects to all Australian Indigenous Peoples and their cultures, and to Elders of past, present and future generations.

QPR Institute Australia

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The QPR Institute Australia website was launched on Friday 8th September, just before World Suicide Prevention Day on 10th September. The website will provide Australians in a range of professions with ready access to the wide variety of QPR training courses developed by Dr Paul Quinnett, clinical psychologist and founder of the QPR Institute, and his team of experts. Dr Paul Quinnett has worked in the field for over 35 years, written 7 books and been on the Board of the American Association of Suicidology.

What does QPR mean?

Q Question

P Persuade

R Refer

QPR stands for Question, Persuade, and Refer — the 3 simple steps anyone can learn to help save a life from suicide.

Just as people trained in CPR help save thousands of lives each year, people trained in QPR learn how to recognize the warning signs of a suicide crisis and how to question, persuade, and refer someone to help. Each year thousands of Australians, like you, are saying “Yes” to saving the life of a friend, colleague, sibling, or neighbour.

QPR can be learned in our Gatekeeper course in as little as one hour, but two hours is preferred.

QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention is listed in the National Registry of Evidence-based Practices and Policies as published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration at: www.samhsa.gov.

Suicide Prevention Training Courses

The QPR Gatekeeping Training for Suicide Prevention course which is designed to inform and upskill the general public in being able to intervene appropriately to assist people who are at risk of suicide. This course is listed in the National Registry of Evidence-based Practices and Policies (NREPP). The QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention course is currently on sale at a special price of $20, reduced from RRP $40 for the month of World Suicide Prevention Day (expires 10/10/17).

• The Suicide Triage Training course which is designed to suit youth workers, school and career guidance counsellors, pastoral care workers, mental health case managers and other welfare professionals.

• Customised advanced professional courses which are designed to meet the practice needs of specific health and welfare professionals including: Nurses, Physicians, Allied Health Professionals, Mental health practitioners, Law enforcement officers, Corrections officers, Firefighters and emergency service personnel, Sport coaches and staff, Clergy, and Crisis line volunteers. Suicide bereavement, grief and trauma course is coming soon.

These online courses are accessible at qprinstituteaustralia.com.au. The cost for each course varies and full details are available on this web site.

Dr Paul Quinnett says, “Since 1996 nearly three million US citizens have been trained in QPR, a CPR intervention equivalent for mental health emergencies. Numerous national surveys have found a large training deficit among front-line professionals tasked with preventing suicide. QPR Institute worked with dozens of professional groups to better train professionals by creating and customizing a full library of QPR-based online training programs to meet specific work site needs. The online library includes customized training for a wide variety of professionals who are often in the best possible position to intercept a suicidal person during the workday. These online courses received high marks from professionals who completed the training.  We are very excited to bring these life-saving training programs to Australia through our newly established QPR Institute Australia. Working together, we can all save lives.”

QPR online courses vary in length from 2 hours to more than 6 hours. They are interactive and use proven, multi-media e-learning teaching techniques. The modular format means that these courses can be undertaken at a time and place that best suits the learner, including from any PC or mobile device.

All QPR courses are evidence-based, heavily tested and peer reviewed and the majority of courses are listed in the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) Best Practice Registry.

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What is a Gatekeeper?

According to the Surgeon General’s National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (2001), a gatekeeper is someone in a position to recognize a crisis and the warning signs that someone may be contemplating suicide.

Gatekeepers can be anyone, but include parents, friends, neighbours, teachers, ministers, doctors, nurses, office supervisors, squad leaders, foremen, police officers, advisors, caseworkers, firefighters, and many others who are strategically positioned to recognize and refer someone at risk of suicide.

As a QPR-trained Gatekeeper you will learn to:

• Recognize the warning signs of suicide

• Know how to offer hope

• Know how to get help and save a life

About QPR Institute Australia

A key objective of QPR Institute Australia is to increase the uptake of QPR on-line and face-to-face training programs in Australia, thereby equipping Australians with the skills and confidence that will enable them to intervene appropriately to the save the lives of those at risk of suicide.

Our Mission

To save lives and reduce suicidal behaviours by providing innovative, practical and proven suicide prevention training. We believe that quality education empowers all people, regardless of their background, to make a positive difference in the life of someone they know.

For more information, please visit the QPR Institute Australia website qprinstituteaustralia.com.au. Please contact via email admin@qprinstituteaustralia.com.au or Alan Staines, alanstaines@optusnet.com.au or 02 9890 2400 / 0412 164 575.

The Need

Suicide is one of the most critical health concerns, both in Australia and on a global scale. In 2015, over 3000 Australians died by suicide. For every suicide death, as many as 25 individuals will attempt suicide, and for some communities, such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and LGBTI people, rates of suicide attempts and deaths are even higher.

Over the past decade in Australia, there has been a 20% increase in the number of suicides and suicide is the leading cause of death for Australians aged 15-44.

We also know that suicide rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are at least twice that of non-Indigenous Australians, and that while women make more suicide attempts, 75% of suicides are by men.

Some people in the community are particularly vulnerable, for example men aged 18 to 24 who have previously served in the Australian Defense Forces are twice as likely to die by suicide as men of the same age in the general population.

Other workforces with higher risk of suicide can include those working in agricultural, transport and construction and health sectors.

Clearly, the need for QPR training across the community is very high.

Dr. Paul Quinnett said, “We are training at least 10,000 people a month with at least 5,000 instructors.  The program is called QPR – Question, Persuade and Refer. In essence, it is suicide prevention training.”

“How you ask the question is less important than that you ask it. The question may be as simple as ‘Are you considering suicide?’  If they say, ‘Yes’ you should listen to them.  Listen to them tell their story, their history and their emotional struggles.  Don’t pass judgement.  Don’t interrupt them.  Sometimes just the act of listening can stave off a suicide.”

Paul Quinnett says it is vital people are urged to go and see somebody who can help … such as a doctor, counsellor or psychologist.

Alan Staines from Postvention Australia says “QPR online training programs are a community program which provides critical information about the warning signs and how to ask the question. We think that QPR is essential for everyone in the community, thereby reducing the tragic loss to suicide. Suicide is everybody’s business.”

You may know someone who has made a suicide attempt, or may even know someone who died by suicide. It is likely you know someone who has thought, or is thinking, about suicide.

If you are a professional caregiver, police officer, fireman, coach, teacher, youth leader, paramedic, school counsellor, case manager, volunteer or paid staff in any of a hundred different kinds of organisations, you very likely have had first-hand contact with someone who has contemplated suicide.

 

If in crisis or in need of counselling, please contact the following telephone lines:

• Lifeline 13 11 14 (24 hour phone counselling)

• Kids Help Line 1800 55 1800 (24 hour phone counselling)

• Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467 (Professional call back service referral line operates seven days a week)

• Mensline Australia 1300 789 978 (24 hour phone counselling and referral)

• Veterans Line 1800 011 046 (after hours professional telephone crisis counselling for veterans and their families)

Are you a stakeholder in Suicide Prevention?

AISRAP

Suicide Prevention Education Priorities for the Workforce

AISRAP wants 10 minutes of your time – tell them your thoughts on suicide prevention education

GU Ethics Ref No. 2017/803

The Australian Institute for Suicide Research and Prevention (AISRAP) Griffith University, is undertaking a major curriculum review of its post graduate tertiary based programs, the Master of Suicidology and Graduate Certificate in Suicide Prevention Studies.

We would like to modify our programs in a way that is informed not only by international and national cutting edge research in suicide prevention, but by workforce needs and perspectives. Therefore, as a stakeholder in the suicide prevention field, we are genuinely interested in the views you have of our existing program curriculum, as well as any additional ideas and needs of your organization or profession that our programs may be designed to meet.

CLICK on the link just below to ENTER SURVEY.

Education Priorities for Suicide Prevention Workforce: Stakeholder Views

What would I be asked to do? How much time would it take?

The questionnaire will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Participation is voluntary and the results are anonymous.  You may withdraw at any time.

Please note: regards to maintaining your own privacy and that of others, that if you choose to make comments on any postings or media adverts concerning this study, you should be aware of the potential dangers of accidental public exposure of your own personal details, identifiable information and that of others when you make such  comments or ‘share’ the media post etc.

How can I find out more?

The research is being conducted by Ms Jacinta Hawgood  (Senior Lecturer, AISRAP), and has had design input from Alumni students Ms Ingrid Ozols and Ms Maddeline Mooney.  Further details are contained within the survey link.

If you have any other questions please feel free to contact:

Chief Investigator: Ms Jacinta Hawgood,

Email: jacinta.hawgood@griffith.edu.au

Ph: 07 3735 3394 (Wed-Friday)

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Suicide Callback Service     1300 659 467

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace      Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline 1300 78 99 78

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527    Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia Helpline 1800 18 7263

“Lessons for Life”, SANE Australia

The experiences of people who attempt suicide:
A qualitative research report

“Factors that promote recovery

Professional support (16), access to effective and affordable
treatments (17), and support from family and friends (16)
were mentioned the most frequently in terms of what helped
participants. People also talked of learning better coping
mechanisms and insight (11), having people understand and not
judge them, having others (5) check in to make sure that they
are OK, and better communication and increased connectedness
(4). Five of the participants also highlighted that the beginning
of a new life stage – in particular the responsibility of having
children – helped them on their path to recovery. Being involved
in less stressful work or volunteering (4), and becoming aware
of the impact that suicide has on others (5), were also cited
as reasons for their progression towards better mental health.
These results mirror findings by Chelsey and Loring-McNulty
(2003) showing that suicide survivors draw on a range of
supports in helping them with their suicidal feelings.

Alison talks about the importance of an ongoing relationship
with a mental health professional as a way to stay well:
‘I knew that for me getting ongoing access to either psychological
or psychiatric therapy was critical. For me, it’s like, you know,
going to the gym. So this is what I do to keep myself well mentally,
and if I don’t do that then sooner or later life happens, enough you
know, that there is more going on than I can actually deal with and
process. And the more I have to put things in the cupboard without
dealing with them, without processing them, then it builds up to
a critical level and then I get depressed because the skeletons are
rattling and I can’t deal with them.’
Alison (50)” (Page 27).

sane-australia-logo

Lessons for Life

For help in Australia

CAPS – Talk Suicide Support Service – Free telephone and face to face support      1800 008 255

Suicide Callback Service     1300 659 467

Salvation Army Care Line     1300 36 36 22

Reach Out     http://au.reachout.com/tough-times

Headspace      Headspace

Lifeline    13 11 14

Mensline 1300 78 99 78

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Mates in Construction: 1300 642 111

QLife        1800 184 527                                                                                               Phone & Chat  3.00 – 12.00 pm everyday

SANE Australia Helpline 1800 18 7263

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